Foreign investments by pension funds protect Canadas tripleA credit rating

first_img Sponsored By: Canadian corporations have ramped up their spending abroad as Canada deals with significant levels of debt.Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg advertisement 0 Comments Featured Stories Twitter April 23, 201912:21 PM EDT Filed under News FP Street Foreign investments by pension funds protect Canada’s triple-A credit rating Since 2011, the value of Canada’s overseas assets has more than doubled, says the global credit rating agency Fitch Email Share this storyForeign investments by pension funds protect Canada’s triple-A credit rating Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Facebook Recommended For YouMicrosoft beats on sales and profit on strength of cloud businessLoonie could hit US$0.80 before Bank of Canada crashes the partyShopify launches network of warehouses and shipping in U.S. to handle orders for independent merchantsThe storm is coming and investors need a financial ark to see them throughTrans Mountain construction work can go ahead as National Energy Board re-validates permits Join the conversation → Comment Reddit What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Esteban Duarte Bloomberg News More Canada’s trove of overseas assets, including airports and roads owned by pension funds, is helping to protect the country’s top credit rating, according to Fitch Ratings.Foreign assets held by Canadians reached $3.71 trillion US at the end of 2018, exceeding foreign liabilities by $528.6 billion US$ and making the country a net creditor to the rest of the world.That’s helping to support the credit rating, despite a mountain of public-sector debt and persistent current account deficits that would typically undermine a nation’s creditworthiness, Fitch said. The current account includes trade in goods and services, as well as net earnings on cross-border investments and transfer payments. Stephen Poloz’s dashboard: The latest charts that matter most to the Bank of Canada CPPIB and Ontario Teachers’ on team buying British satellite operator Inmarsat for $3.4 billion Brookfield buys most of Oaktree in $4.8 billion deal to build juggernaut to rival Blackstone “Countries that run current account deficits are countries that tend to pull the rating down,” said James McCormack, Fitch’s global head of sovereign & supranational group. Nonetheless, “Canada is building more external assets than external liabilities.”Canada historically had been a debtor nation, with net liabilities peaking at $333 billion US in 2011, according to Statistics Canada. But since then, the country has seen the value of its foreign assets more than double, helped in part by a weaker Canadian dollar. That outpaced a 72 per cent increase in liabilities. The nation turned from debtor to creditor in 2014.The $2.2 trillion US economy is supporting public sector debt — provincial and federal — equivalent to almost 90 per cent of its output, compared with an average of about 40 per cent for the 11 countries rated AAA by Fitch. Top-rated countries have on average been reporting current account surpluses while Canada has posted deficits of about two percentage points to almost four percentage points of gross domestic product in the last decade.Pension FundsThose weaknesses would put the country’s rating in the AA-range, were it not for a two-level uplift that Fitch applies to take into account issues including the net international investment position and unfunded pension commitments that are lower than its peers, wrote McCormack, who previously was a Bank of Canada official as well as a Goldman Sachs Group Inc. alumni.Only Canada and Denmark are given that adjustment, said McCormack.Pension funds such as the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board and the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec are playing a key role in bolstering Canada’s presence abroad. Pension fund assets rose 53 per cent to $1.92 trillion US at the end of 2018 from $1.25 trillion US in the second quarter of 2011, according to Statistics Canada.Clear LiabilitiesCPPIB, which manages the pension savings of all Canadians except those in Quebec, had $302.3 billion US of investments overseas in the fiscal year ended March 2018, or almost 85 per cent of its assets under management, according to its annual report. Last month, it committed about $900 million US in a joint bid for U.K. satellite company Inmarsat Plc.Almost two-thirds of the Caisse’s $309.5 billion US of assets at the end of last year were invested outside of Canada. On April 5, the Caisse announced a deal with with France’s Engie SA to buy 90 per cent of Petroleo Brasileiro SA’s pipeline unit TAG for $8.6 billion US.Other big overseas investors include Brookfield Asset Management Inc., which has about $350 billion US under management.“Despite heavily financing ourselves abroad, Canadians have not dug themselves into a foreign debt hole,” Avery Shenfeld, chief economist at Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, said Friday in a separate note. “If we sold everything we’ve added to our balance sheets in assets abroad, as a country, we could clear our liabilities.”To be sure, the country’s international net international investment position may be not enough to protect the country’s top rating should public debt ratios head upward and rise over 90 per cent of GDP, said McCormick.Also, the country’s net international investment position declined by $109.1 billion US in the last quarter after reaching record $637.7 billion US at the end September, according to government data.Shenfeld also cautions that in the next downturn the value of Canada’s overseas assets may slip while the country will still have to make interest payments on debt held abroad. ← Previous Next →last_img read more

Merger of Germanys two biggest banks Deutsche and Commerzbank would put 30000

first_img Comment Reddit March 18, 20197:05 AM EDT Filed under News FP Street Twitter Reuters ← Previous Next → Recommended For YouAlberta wildfires are driving the price of Canadian crude oil higher’Wounded bulls’ remain nervous as oil prices rally ahead of earnings seasonUPDATE 2-Lagarde ECB pick triggers euro-zone share rally as investors seek yieldAppili Therapeutics Announces Filing of Final ProspectusJust what is Warren Buffett getting up to in Europe? Merger of Germany’s two biggest banks, Deutsche and Commerzbank, would put 30,000 jobs at risk, warns union A top investor in Deutsche Bank also expressed doubts about a potential merger Sponsored By: More Join the conversation →center_img 0 Comments BERLIN/FRANKFURT — A merger of Deutsche Bank and its rival Commerzbank could result in as many as 30,000 job cuts over the long term, a representative of German union Verdi who is a Deutsche supervisory board member told n-tv broadcaster.A top investor in Deutsche Bank also expressed doubts about a potential merger, according to a person close to the investor.The fierce opposition from the union and shareholder reservations come after both banks on Sunday confirmed talks about a merger and underlines the obstacles to efforts to combine Germany’s two biggest banks.Most of the 30,000 positions at risk are based in Germany, Verdi’s Jan Duscheck said, according to comments published by the TV station on Monday. Over the short term there are 10,000 jobs under threat, Duscheck added.However, the initial market reaction was positive. Shares in Deutsche Bank were up 3.3 per cent at 0829 GMT while Commerzbank traded 4 per cent higher.The supervisory boards of both banks meet on Thursday when the merger is likely to be discussed.Related Stories:UPDATE 2-Deutsche Bank to axe investment bankers in up to $5.6 bln revampDeutsche Bank restructuring to cost up to $5.6 billion – sourceDeutsche Bank to cut 18,000 jobs in 7.4 bln euro overhaulThe German government has pushed for a combination given concerns about the health of Deutsche, which has struggled to generate sustainable profits since the 2008 financial crisis.The government, which holds a stake of more than 15 per cent in Commerzbank following a bailout, wants a national banking champion to support its export-led economy, best known for cars and machine tools.However, the jobs impact will be a big issue.“In our opinion a possible merger would not result in a business model that is sustainable in the long term,” Verdi’s Duscheck said.A major Deutsche shareholder is not fundamentally opposed to a merger, said a person close to the unnamed shareholder, but wants to hear a compelling case for a deal.“We have considerable doubts about the logic and the timing and want to be convinced,” the person said.A merged bank would have one fifth of the German retail banking market. Together the two banks currently employ 140,000 people worldwide – 91,700 at Deutsche and 49,000 in Commerzbank. © Thomson Reuters 2019 Facebook Featured Stories Headquarters of Deutsche Bank, left, and Commerzbank are seen in Frankfurt as Germany’s two biggest banks begin talks on a possible merger.AP Photo/Michael Probst advertisement Email Share this storyMerger of Germany’s two biggest banks, Deutsche and Commerzbank, would put 30,000 jobs at risk, warns union Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generationlast_img read more

The Tesla Semi Truck Is Actually Delivering Cars To Customers

first_imgWe’ve seen the Tesla Semi hauling cars, but now it’s officially taking them to owners’ homes.Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

In June 2019 PlugIn EV Car Sales In Norway Surge To 58

first_imgMore than 3,000 Tesla Model 3 registered in June drives electric car sales in Norway up by 87%.Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

SCOTUS Limits SEC Disgorgement What It Means for Sam Wyly and Other

first_img Username Password Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. When the U.S. Supreme Court last week imposed a five-year statute of limitations on any claim for disgorgement in a Securities and Exchange Commission enforcement action, the justices almost certainly impacted the government’s case against Sam Wyly and the estate of his brother. The ruling will likely mean that at least a portion of the $187 million judgment remaining against the Wylys will be vacated. This article has the details of the decision . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Lost your password? Remember melast_img read more

Local Councilman DiesApple Loop Trails FutureGovernor Declares War On Opioid AbuseSpokane ExplosionState

first_imgLongtime East Wenatchee city councilman George Buckner suffered a brain aneurysm Friday morning while playing golf, and later died. In a Wenatchee World story, his wife of 30-years, Marie, said he was doing what he loved most at the time of his collapse, at the Wenatchee Golf and Country Club. He died five hours later at Central Washington Hospital surrounded by family and friends. He was 83. Buckner was a city councilman since 1998, and had served first in the Marines, then 25 years in the military reserves. He graduated from Harvard in economics, earned an MBA at Wharton school of business, and had established a long-running career as an investment counselor. He called East Wenatchee home since 1986.last_img read more

Study delves into reasons for increased preference of the elderly to live

first_img Source:https://www.fecyt.es/ May 22 2018For decades, the elderly in Spain have shown a preference for living at home, either alone or with their partners, instead of sharing a home with relatives of other generations. A study by the University of Granada delves into the reasons for this trend.Intergenerational cohabitation in Spanish families is an essential resource for many adult children due to the current emancipation patterns among the young. However, for decades, the tendency among older people in Spain has been to live with their partners or on their own after being widowed.Juan López Doblas, researcher at the University of Granada (UGR), has published a study in Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas (Spanish Journal of Sociological Research) on the reasons that lead these people to live alone, instead of sharing the household with relatives of other generations.”In the Western world, it’s been happening since the mid-twentieth century because that is when Social Security and pensions were established. In Spain, this arrived a bit late, as in other Mediterranean countries, because values of a more individualistic type have traditionally been more typical of Nordic countries”, says the scientist.The study was based on interviews lasting more than one hour with various groups of people over 63. The regions of Asturias and Andalusia were chosen, because they have different rates of population aging and, additionally, the senior citizens living there differ substantially in essential aspects, such as pension amounts or educational level.”What we’ve observed in the study is that, at present, older people have a preference for privacy and freedom, and that comes before being kept company,” López Doblas points out.All the discussion groups consisted of a majority of widowed persons, which reflects the numerical predominance within the population group under study.Emotional attachment to one’s home and social isolationOne of the most important aspects for understanding the reasons for the decline of intergenerational coexistence in Spain lies in the household in question. According to the work, the elderly are aware that they cannot expect their families to come to live with them, so it is they who would have to move in with their families. And such a decision would most likely mean having to definitively quit the household they have been living in for decades, which is something that, as the study reveals, they refuse to do unless it is absolutely necessary.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromePuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCAccording to the author, “they have a strong emotional attachment to their homes, even when living conditions aren’t the best. They regard moving house as an unnecessary personal sacrifice that would also, besides, isolate them from their social environment, where they can socialise with family, neighbours and friends.”Living alone despite low pensionsThe study also significantly reflects the manner in which the participants in the discussion groups explain what their lives would be like if they chose to live with their families. “They understand that if they shared the household with relatives, they’d be a burden for them, which is something they want to avoid at all costs. They also reject this so as not to meddle in their private lives, or disturb their privacy. And they fear that daily cohabitation would eventually and inevitably generate discomfort, arguments and conflicts,” he explains.Regarding pensions, although they are usually low, especially for many widowed women, this does not prevent them from managing to be self-sufficient. It is something that they achieve through a thorough control of spending, which often entails austerity in the consumption of even basic goods and services.”Widowed people are forced, for the first time in their lives, to handle roles and experiences that are initially very harsh, in addition to loneliness. Adaptation is very difficult. But after a while, they also value freedom. It is a balance between the risks and the positive aspects,” concludes López Doblas.last_img read more

Researchers find new method to treat severe asthma

first_imgMay 23 2018Researchers from McMaster University and the Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, together with colleagues at other partnering institutions, have developed a new method to treat severe asthma. In a study of over 200 participants with severe asthma, the new treatment was shown to have improved asthma symptoms and lung function, while reducing the need for corticosteroids by up to 70%.According to Statistics Canada, 8% of Canadians aged 12 or older – approximately 2.4 million people – have been diagnosed with asthma. Of that, approximately 25% are considered to be severe cases of asthma.Current treatments for severe asthma often include high doses of corticosteroids, such as prednisone, to control exacerbations. Reducing the need for corticosteroids with alternative treatments is preferable, since these medications are associated with serious side effects from prolonged use – including multi-organ toxicities and immunosuppression.Dr. Parameswaran Nair, staff respirologist at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and professor of medicine at McMaster University, along with a team of researchers found that an antibody called dupilumab is effective in treating severe asthma in place of high doses of prednisone. The results were published in the New England Journal of Medicine, one of the world’s most influential medical publications.Researchers sought participants who had been using oral corticosteroids (prednisone) to treat severe asthma for at least six months prior to the study. In addition to their standard regimen of corticosteroids, patients received either dupilumab or a placebo during the 24 week trial. The corticosteroid dose was gradually reduced during weeks four to 20, and maintained at a low level for the final four weeks.”The ability of dupilumab to increase lung function as markedly as it did in this study, even in the face of [corticosteroid] withdrawal, indicates that it appears to be inhibiting key drivers of lung inflammation,” the researchers noted.Dupilumab works to treat asthma by blocking two specific proteins (called interleukin-4 and interleukin-13) that are associated with inflammation of the airways.This technique was based on Dr. Nair’s previous work published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2009 and in 2017. Those studies found that blocking another protein, interleukin-5, allowed patients with high eosinophil levels in their blood and airways to reduce their corticosteroid dose. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell involved with the production of interleukins. High eosinophil levels are directly linked to an increased risk of severe asthma.Related StoriesEliminating asthma triggers right at the source to create healthier homesGrowing up on farm with animals may half risk of asthma and allergies, suggests studyWorld Asthma Day: How climate change is increasing cases of asthmaUnlike the previous studies, dupilumab was shown to be effective regardless of patients’ eosinophil levels. Despite the reduced prednisone dose, patients in this study not only experienced a decrease in asthma exacerbations, but their lung function also improved significantly.”Ultimately, our goal is to find new treatment pathways that allow us to circumvent the use of corticosteroids,” said Dr. Nair. “Since dupilumab showed a significant improvement on asthma control regardless of eosinophil levels, we may be able to use this treatment for a wider range of patients than we previously thought possible. This might be due to the broad effects on inflammation in asthma of the two proteins that we were able to block with dupilumab. The treatment was not associated with any serious side effects.”Dr. Nair and his team presented the details of their study at the American Thoracic Society’s international conference in San Diego this past week. There, researchers and clinicians from around the world gathered to discuss respiratory illnesses and the latest breakthroughs in treatment.”This work highlights the clinical and research excellence in pulmonary diseases that exists at St Joseph’s and the Firestone Institute,” explained Dr. Jack Gauldie, vice president (research) at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and a professor emeritus of McMaster University.”Dr. Nair is one of the world’s best clinicians in the field of severe asthma and his studies on modification of immune regulation, targeting two important immune factors, bring an immense impact directly from the lab to the patient in managing this difficult and dangerous form of asthma. We are immensely proud of these advances in pulmonary medicine.” Source:http://www.mcmaster.ca/last_img read more

Microbiologists and plant scientists pinpoint genetic weakness in cholera pandemics armor

first_img Source:https://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2018/microbiologists-and-plant-scientists-find-secret-to-tackling-cholera/?utm_campaign=media-pitch&utm_medium=email Jun 26 2018While cholera rages across many regions of the world, a team of microbiologists and plant scientists has pinpointed a genetic weakness in the pandemic’s armor, which could lead to future treatments.The current cholera pandemic began in Indonesia in 1961. Rather than fade away like its six previous worldwide outbreak predecessors, the responsible strain is thriving and actually picking up steam. A discovery, led by scientists from Michigan State University and Tufts University and featured in the current issue of PNAS, shows the key genetic change the seventh pandemic acquired to thrive for more than 50 years.The interdisciplinary team of scientists reveal the first ever signaling network for a new bacterial signal, cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP), in the human cholera pathogen. The team also identified the first protein receptor of cGAMP as a phospholipase enzyme that remodels the V. cholerae membrane when cGAMP is produced.”When this pandemic emerged, it virtually displaced all of the other V. cholerae isolates, or previous strains, on a worldwide scale,” said Chris Waters, MSU microbiology professor, who co-led the study with Wai-Leung Ng, Tufts microbiologist. “No one really knows why this happened. Our discovery of cGAMP synthase and phospholipase, which are present only in the seventh pandemic, could be key drivers of the seventh cholera pandemic.”The evolution of this new signaling ability has contributed to this current strain – nicknamed “El Tor” – in causing around 95,000 deaths annually. Just last year in Yemen, more than 1 million people contracted cholera and nearly 2,200 people died, making it one of the largest cholera outbreaks in world history.Serendipity and interdisciplinary research contributed to this discovery. Even though they were postdoctoral fellows at Princeton University together, Waters and Ng didn’t realize they were studying the same genetic pathway until they landed their positions at their respected universities.Related StoriesMetabolic enzyme tied to obesity and fatty liver diseaseGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”Molecular switches may control lifespan and healthspan separately, genetic discovery suggestsOnce they began to compare notes, they realized their research had real potential to understand this new cholera pandemic.Graduate students Geoff Severin in the Waters lab and Miriam Ramliden in the Ng lab led the team to an island – the Vibrio seventh pandemic island – to find cholera’s genetic advances that’s allowed El Tor to find the traits none of its predecessors possessed. On this atoll of around 20 newly acquired genes was where they found the buried treasure of the phospholipase cGAMP receptor.Waters knew that Christoph Benning, a renowned plant scientist and director of the MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory, was an expert in lipids and would possibly have some leads on the phospholipase – enzymes that degrade membrane building blocks – on which they were focusing.”I immediately answered that yes we would like to help and that we could contribute to this research,” Benning said. “If you break it down to the biochemistry, it doesn’t matter if it’s a human, bacterium or plant; we have many of the same genes and enzymes.”And indeed they did. Benning enlisted the help of Kenny (Kun) Wang, a former graduate student in his lab. Wang had become an expert on these types of plant proteins, which are tricky to produce as they can destroy cells in the process. He obtained and made the cholera phospholipase work in a test tube so the team could study how it is controlled by cGAMP.Now that the scientists have unearthed the treasure, they’re looking for the keys to unlock one of El Tor’s greatest strengths, and turn it against itself.”We think this new system is one of the key elements that led to the emergence and persistence of the current pandemic,” Ng said. “Our future research will try to understand the role that the cGAMP/phospholipase system played in this emergence.”last_img read more

Test your smarts on Sciences Breakthrough of the Year quiz

first_img The ability to bake bread Checkers One Go. Compared with chess, the ancient Chinese board game of Go has been harder for artificial intelligence to crack. Its rules are much simpler: Players take turns placing small black or white stones on a 19-by-19 grid to gain territory. But the larger board and astronomical number of possible arrangements of stones make the game much less amenable to exhaustive analysis. So how did AlphaGo get to be so good? First, human programmers taught their creations to play thousands of random games, a brute-force style that enabled them to compete with strong amateurs. Then, programmers started to apply deep neural networks. In essence, this gives computers a way of learning by themselves from master games—and from contests with themselves. It looks like all that training paid off: After winning its final match, AlphaGo earned the title of “ninth dan,” an honorific reserved for players whose skills border on the divine. Two neutron stars merging Question 0 / 10 Zebrafish Proteins An error occurred loading the Quiz. Please try again later. Score Nucleic acids Chess MRI machines One. The story of our species is driven by wanderlust. Born in Africa, Homo sapiens expanded into the far corners of the globe in the past 100,000 years, meeting and mingling with more archaic hominins already living there. But researchers have long debated how and when modern humans left Africa: Was it in a single migration or in repeated waves? In 2016, a burst of genomic data all but clinched the case that most living people outside Africa descend from a single migration; any earlier migrations were mostly swamped by this last wave. December 23, 2016 A pocket-sized version of this machine is revolutionizing biology: Top Ranker Proteins. These macromolecules are life’s workhorses, speeding up vital chemical reactions, communicating between cells, and defending against invaders. Given these talents, scientists have long wanted to create their own versions. This year, they took protein modification to a whole new level: They created a suite of designer proteins unlike anything found in nature, setting the stage for everything from novel biosensors to new ways to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Injecting stem cells into spinal fluid Click to enter Selectively killing old cells. Pricey plastic surgery won’t stop you from getting old. Nor will dietary supplements, testosterone injections, or those wrinkle creams that imply they’ll make you look 21 again. But this year, researchers demonstrated one way to postpone some ravages of time—at least in mice. When they selectively weeded out run-down cells, which seem to contribute to atherosclerosis, the animals lived longer and remained healthier as they aged. Proxima Centauri. After years of scrutinizing this red dwarf—the closest star to Earth aside from the sun—astronomers finally found evidence of a planet in the star’s habitable zone. The planet, known as Proxima b, is just 4.25 light-years from Earth. Cosmically speaking, that’s just a stone’s throw away, putting the planet within range of telescopes and techniques that could reveal more about its makeup than any other exoplanet discovered to date. Non-cosmically speaking, it’s still a bit distant: It would take not-yet-invented craft traveling at 20% the speed of light nearly 20 years to reach the star system. Win a FREE digital subscription to Science! Just submit the required contact information to enter. The Science Quiz tests your knowledge of the week’s biggest science news stories. No matter how much you know, you’re still likely to learn something–give it a try! 0 In another region of space, an Earth-like planet was found this year orbiting our nearest stellar neighbor. Who is that neighbor? Sirius Not applicable. Everyone knows that our planet was seeded by the beings of Zeta Reticuli. Mice. Giving new meaning to the term “test-tube babies,” scientists in Japan this year produced mouse pups from egg cells grown entirely in a lab dish. This long-sought achievement offers researchers a new way to study egg development and raises the more distant prospect of making human eggs in the lab from almost any type of cell, including genetically altered ones. That possibility has sparked hope for new infertility treatments, but it has also revived fears about designer babies. You As thin as a credit card As thin as a sheet of paper. Older glass lenses, used in everything from smartphone cameras to microscopes, are bulky, heavy, and expensive. Now, scientists have created high-power lenses from thin, flat arrays of nanosized towers of titanium dioxide. The novel lenses are made from so-called metamaterials, engineered to control the way light waves interact. The setup allows them to magnify images up to 170 times with high resolution, as good as conventional state-of-the-art optics. The new lenses could also be made—at much lower cost—with standard computer chip–making techniques, meaning they may soon be coming to a smartphone near you. On Christmas Day in 2015, physicists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) made the second-ever observation of gravitational waves. What triggered the pulse? Proxima Centauri Average Several studies this year revealed a relatively simple way to extend life span. What is it? The ability to “read minds.” This simply means the ability to intuit what someone else is thinking, even when that individual’s beliefs are wrong. For years, only humans were thought to have this key cognitive skill, which is believed to underlie deception, empathy, teaching, and even language. But using an ape-oriented soap opera in which a researcher dressed up as another ape, scientists have shown that three species of great apes—chimpanzees, bonobos, and orangutans—also know when someone holds a false belief. The groundbreaking study suggests that this skill likely can be traced back to the last common ancestor of great apes and humans, and it may be found in other species. Making a vision board LOADING The ability to “read minds” Back on Earth, scientists discovered that chimpanzees, bonobos, and orangutans may share this very special trait with humans: An explosion in a dilithium mine on Ceti Alpha 6 How did you score on the quiz? Challenge your friends to a science news duel!center_img The ability to use Snapchat Enter the information below to enter the sweepstakes:Your information has been submitted.An error occurred submitting the email. Please try again later.This email has already been entered.The email submitted is not a valid email.Incomplete form. Please fill out all fields. Select CountryAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntigua & BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaireBosnia & HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCanary IslandsCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChannel IslandsChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos IslandColombiaComorosCongoCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuracaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEast TimorEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland IslandsFaroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreat BritainGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuyanaHaitiHawaiiHondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea NorthKorea SouthKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacauMacedoniaMadagascarMalaysiaMalawiMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMidway IslandsMoldovaMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNambiaNauruNepalNetherland AntillesNetherlands (Holland, Europe)NevisNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalau IslandPalestinePanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairn IslandPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRepublic of MontenegroRepublic of SerbiaReunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSt BarthelemySt EustatiusSt HelenaSt Kitts-NevisSt LuciaSt MaartenSt Pierre & MiquelonSt Vincent & GrenadinesSaipanSamoaSamoa AmericanSan MarinoSao Tome & PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTahitiTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad & TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks & Caicos IsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUSAUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVatican City StateVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (Brit)Virgin Islands (USA)Wake IslandWallis & Futana IsYemenZaireZambiaZimbabweBy Entering you agree to receive email from AAAS about AAAS products and Services (you can opt out of these emails at any time). I would like to receive emails about products and services offered by AAAS advertisers.PRIVACY I have read and accept the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.Submit Three Selectively killing old cells In another major breakthrough, scientists created a designer suite of these molecules from scratch: Two DNA sequencers Carbohydrates Polyphenols Official rules for the News from Science weekly quiz sweepstakes The ability to make metal tools The Science Quiz Electroencephalography machines Mice December 23, 2016 The Science Quiz Take the quiz to enter for a chance to win a FREE digital subscription to Science! Learn More Two black holes colliding Capping DNA telomeres Go Humans As thin as a politician’s skin Two black holes colliding. The biggest discovery in science this year—the observation of ripples in spacetime called gravitational waves—was no fluke. For a second time, physicists used LIGO to detect the pulse of such waves, which they announced in early February. Once again the waves emanated from the merger of two black holes, the ultraintense gravitational fields left behind when massive stars collapse into infinitesimal points. The new observation suggests that after fine-tuning, the LIGO will spot dozens or even hundreds of the otherwise undetectable events each year. It may also herald the birth of a new field: gravitational wave astronomy. That’s why LIGO’s success was Science’s Breakthrough of the Year. Enter for a chance to win. We’ll select a new winner each week. Genomic studies this year all but proved that most people living outside Africa descended from this many “waves” of migrants: Beta Taco Start Quiz Scientists created something else this year: babies born from egg cells grown entirely in a lab. What species did the egg cells come from? Just how thin is this new lens made of nanomaterials? Jellyfish LIGO/T. Pyle As thin as a razor blade As thin as a sheet of paper M. Khorasaninejad, W.T. Chen, A.Zhu, J.Oh, and R. Devlin Polaris Results: You answered out of correctly – Click to revisit The faster you answer, the higher you score! Challenge your friends and sign up for your chance to win a free digital subscription to Science. Two stars going supernova DNA sequencers. The new devices use a breakthrough technology called nanopore sequencing to read the letters of DNA directly: As a strand of DNA passes through a narrow pore, the bases alter an ionic current in a unique, readable way. The big advantages over traditional sequencing are that the startup cost is relatively low and the machine can, in theory, decipher unlimited lengths of DNA; the genome doesn’t have to be chopped up and the sequences pieced together later by a computer. And because it’s quick and portable—the device can churn out sequences in a matter of hours—it can potentially be used for biosurveillance, clinical diagnosis, and the investigation of disease outbreaks onsite. Want to read more about this and Science’s other breakthroughs of the year? Get your holiday fill-up here! See you in 2017. Time’s Up! Parcheesi Faraday cages Google’s artificial intelligence program AlphaGo earlier this year beat world champion Lee Sedol in a man-versus-machine match of what game? Share your scorelast_img read more

Oddball scientists the rise of Chinese research and other highlights from NSFs

first_img Combating a climate of doubtParts of Indicators track trends that only a true science wonk could love, such as the $272 billion in global payments made for the use of intellectual property—patents, trademarks, copyrights, and industrial processes. In contrast, its chapter on public attitudes toward science appeals to a much wider audience.This year, NSF made two small, but potentially important, adjustments to its analyses of how the public views climate change and the researchers who work on this sensitive topic. The result is a much stronger statement on the scientific evidence for climate change.In past years, NSF began the discussion by simply noting that climate change “is a central, and often divisive, environmental issue for many Americans.” This year, however, NSF extended that introductory sentence to include an assessment of the state of the science. Specifically, it noted that “the scientific evidence overwhelmingly supports the conclusion that climate change is already occurring, that it will have a wide range of negative effects on Americans and residents of other countries, and that it is largely the result of human activities.”Many Republicans in Congress would take issue with that three-part assessment, in particular, that climate change is harmful and human-induced. But the report is unequivocal. Several paragraphs later, it states that “many Americans do not appear to know that the vast majority of scientists believe there is solid evidence of climate change and that humans are the dominant cause.” In previous iterations of Indicators, the equivalent section simply noted that “only a small majority of Americans believe that scientists have reached a consensus on climate change.” Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe China’s growing strength in science has been a recurring theme in recent editions of the National Science Foundation’s biennial statistical compendium. (Data) National Science Foundation; (Chart) J. You/Science Are scientists “odd and peculiar”?What the public thinks about scientists is often used as a metric for its attitude toward the scientific enterprise itself. To the extent that is true, this year’s report might give scientists pause.As part of a general survey of the U.S. adult population, NSF has periodically asked them to agree or disagree with the statement “Scientists are apt to be odd and peculiar people.” And this time around, scientists received a record-high oddball quotient.More than half of Americans—52%—agreed with the statement, up from 36% in 2012. In 2001 only 24% gave scientists such a label. Those with just a high school education—in other words, presumably less familiar with what scientists do—were especially leery, with 58% calling them odd and peculiar. But even among those with graduate or professional degrees, some 37% felt those labels were warranted. Similarly, only 37% of adults disagree with the idea that scientists are odd and peculiar, down from 63% in 2001.Even so, U.S. scientists can find plenty in the 2018 edition of Indicators to feel good about. “Americans have high confidence in the scientific community … second only to the military,” the report reassures them. And those looking for reassurance can find succor in the first sentence of the voluminous report: “The United States holds a preeminent position in S&E in the world.” By Jeffrey MervisJan. 19, 2018 , 3:45 PM Oddball scientists, the rise of Chinese research, and other highlights from NSF’s new tome of essential science statisticscenter_img Max Braun/Flickr (CC BY SA 2.0) Scientists discover something new every day. But science policy trends can take decades to reveal themselves. That’s why the bottom line in the newest edition of an indispensible statistical tome from the National Science Foundation (NSF)—that China continues to close the gap with the United States in the international race for scientific supremacy—will sound very familiar to those who follow these trends.“The U.S. global share of [science and technology] activities is declining as other nations—especially China—continue to rise,” NSF officials declared yesterday in rolling out the 2018 Science & Engineering Indicators, a massive biennial report that tracks scientific activity around the world. “The U.S. still leads by many measures,” adds Maria Zuber, chair of the National Science Board in Alexandria, Virginia, NSF’s oversight body, “but our lead is decreasing in certain areas that are important to the country.”Indicators has been documenting that narrowing over the past decade. In 2010, for example, NSF officials said they saw no end in sight to China’s large, decadelong investments in science. In 2012, agency officials talked about “the beginning of an Asian science zone” with China as the hub. So the new data on China’s scientific prowess—documenting its continued high levels of spending and growing workforce, publications, and commercial high-tech activities—are hardly surprising. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Are scientists odd and peculiar? Polling finds that public perceptions of scientists shifted substantially between 1983 and 2016, with a majority of Americans now agreeing that scientists are “odd and peculiar.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country NSF’s careful tracking of China’s scientific coming-of-age illustrates both the value of Indicators and its limitations. The vast data trove is meant to help scholars, policymakers, and business leaders grapple with a slew of policy questions. They include: How should U.S. universities accustomed to attracting the best talent from around the world respond to the increased competition? Should government agencies require international partners on any large proposed facility and project? What types of rules should govern any commercial spinoffs from such collaborations? More fundamentally, China’s surge has forced U.S. officials to ask themselves whether their country’s scientific hegemony since the end of World War II is sustainable or, instead, merely a short-lived quirk of history.There are no easy answers. And the NSF report assiduously avoids offering up its own analyses, much less any suggestions for dealing with these and other politically charged issues. “Indicators is factual and policy neutral,” NSF writes in the introduction to the online, 1065-page report, which is accompanied by a similarly voluminous appendix of tables. “It does not offer policy options, and it does not make policy recommendations.”Less-than-perfect metricsThat just-the-facts approach has helped Indicators remain largely nonpartisan. But this year’s report, competing for attention in a world of fake news and science deniers, offers hints that NSF may see the need to do more than simply let the facts speak for themselves.One clue is a new sidebar in the opening chapter, entitled “What Makes a Good Indicator?” A “good” indicator is a “direct measure” of a “policy-relevant” topic in enough detail to make “meaningful distinctions,” the article notes. But that’s not always possible, confess the authors, who go on to explain why NSF at times must use less-than-perfect metrics.For example, U.S. policymakers would like to know how many people have the skills needed to fill the available jobs in science and engineering (S&E). Unfortunately, nobody has figured out a way to measure the skills of the current workforce. Instead, NSF uses as a proxy the number of people earning S&E degrees. However, in the real world, millions of people without S&E degrees are holding down S&E jobs. So degree production is, at best, an imperfect indicator of the available talent pool.That’s not the only fly in the indicators’ ointment. Whereas workforce and degree data are collected by NSF, other data come from surveys by other organizations, including companies, other government agencies, or other entities. However, those surveys weren’t designed to be indicators, the report notes, and don’t always directly address the questions that policymakers might have. Still, the report explains, NSF uses them because the data are cheaper and available more quickly than if NSF collected them itself.last_img read more

Sealevel rise could drown dozens of Mediterranean heritage sites

first_img Homes, businesses, and coastal infrastructure aren’t the only things endangered by sea-level rise: A new study suggests nearly 80% of World Heritage sites along the Mediterranean coast are at risk, too. These include the medieval city of Rhodes in Greece, the Kasbah of Algiers in Algeria, and Venice, Italy’s saltwater lagoon (above). An analysis of 49 such low-elevation sites reveals that by the year 2100, all or part of up to 40 will be endangered by storm surges that exceed the level of a 100-year flood, and as many as 46 of them will be threatened by coastal erosion.But nations seeking to protect these sites shouldn’t wait another 80 years to address the problems, researchers warn today in Nature Communications. That’s because 37 of the flood-prone sites and 42 of the erosion-prone sites are already vulnerable, although to a much smaller degree than they will be in the future.To save at-risk sites, some monuments could be moved to higher ground. But that will be impossible for large archaeological sites or urban areas, which will need to be protected through other measures, the researchers write. Some solutions could be as simple as sea walls. But others are more extreme: For example, Venice is now building—at an overall cost approaching €6 billion—a series of gates that can temporarily isolate the city’s lagoon from the Adriatic Sea during exceptionally high tides. iStock.com/Givaga By Sid PerkinsOct. 16, 2018 , 11:00 AMcenter_img Sea-level rise could drown dozens of Mediterranean heritage siteslast_img read more

Four small cities may have played an outsize role in spreading deadly

first_imgThat changed with the 2009 pandemic. For the first time, researchers had access to geographically tagged electronic health claims to insurance companies that showed where people got sick at the local level.When Stephen Kissler, an epidemiologist at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, and his colleagues analyzed these data and used them to build a new model of how flu spread, they found that packed metropolises such as New York City and San Francisco, California—home to 8.6 million and 1 million people, respectively—weren’t where the pandemic picked up steam. Instead, four cities that are home to between 100,000 to 600,000 people each were the hubs that “seeded” the U.S. epidemic, they report in a paper in press at Epidemics: Grenada, Mississippi; Albany, Georgia; Stockton, California; and Omaha, Nebraska. Three-quarters of all U.S. cases had its origins in one of these cities.“The ‘Hollywood’ notion of a highly infectious pandemic [starting in a major city] is not the way things happen in reality,” Kissler says. The results mean that factors beyond population density and travel are important, he says. For instance, previous work has hinted that school start dates might play a role—young kids often serve as viral incubators in their community—or the degree to which a population has prior immunity from recent infections. Sheer coincidence likely plays a big role as well.Sean Moore, an epidemiologist at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, praises the new study. He says future work should also look at the genetics of the virus itself, as a way to track it from place to place. “I’m sure the reality of the pandemic was more complicated than can be measured with the [current] model.”Kissler next wants to examine the years immediately preceding 2009 to gauge whether the annual waves of seasonal influenza take off from smaller cities as well, or whether that was something unique to the 2009 pandemic. “Pandemics can be very surprising things,” he says. “We need to be prepared for the unpredictable.” Four small cities may have played an outsize role in spreading deadly flu People stand in line to get vaccinated against a virus spreading in Omaha, Nebraska, in 2009. You’d think new viruses start spreading first in big cities, with their packed urban streets and large international airports. But a new study challenges this idea. Researchers have found that during the last influenza pandemic, the virus first gained a U.S. foothold in four smaller cities in the Midwest, the Southeast, and California’s Central Valley. From these hubs it engulfed the entire nation, eventually sickening more than 60 million people and killing more than 12,000.The findings suggest those seeking to combat big epidemics need to look beyond the major population centers, says epidemiologist Dennis Chao of the Institute for Disease Modeling in Seattle, Washington, who was not involved with the study. “Anything we can learn about forecasting [flu’s] spread is useful.”The idea that major cities and their airports are important drivers of worldwide contagion makes intuitive sense, and it’s supported by mathematical models. But models don’t always reflect reality. Researchers prefer real-world data to track how an epidemic spreads. Yet for influenza, fine-grained epidemiological data were always hard to come by. By Erin I. Garcia de JesusDec. 4, 2018 , 3:35 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img AP Photo/Nati Harnik Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

National Institutes of Health apologizes for lack of action on sexual harassers

first_img The statement notes that this month, a working group of the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD) formed to discuss sexual harassment met for the first time and heard from neuroscientist BethAnn McLaughlin, a #MeTooSTEM activist who is now involved in a high-profile employment dispute with Vanderbilt University in Nashville. An agency committee reviewing sexual harassment policies within NIH’s intramural program has “heard similar, harrowing accounts,” the statement says. It is “abundantly clear that NIH needs to do better” in dealing with sexual harassment.NIH has come under fire because, unlike the National Science Foundation (NSF), it has not made any formal policy changes specific to sexual harassment. In September 2018, NSF issued new guidance requiring that it be notified within 10 business days when the PI on a grant has been found guilty of sexual harassment or has been put on administrative leave; the agency can then choose to remove the investigator from the grant. NIH, too, requires notification when a PI is removed from their position or put on leave (and can then remove the investigator from the award), but does not ask why the investigator’s status has changed. NIH officials have said legal constraints prevent them from following NSF’s lead.In today’s statement, the agency emphasizes that it has taken action against harassers. Last year, NIH “followed up on” sexual harassment issues at more than 24 institutions and replaced 14 PIs on grants; it also barred 14 individuals from serving as peer reviewers. NIH also notes that institutions took actions against 21 principal investigators including removing some from their positions. “We recognize these numbers seem small compared to the disheartening incidence of sexual harassment described in [a] recent National Academies [of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine] report, but we are continuing to expand our outreach to the extramural community to bring these concerns to our attention,” the agency says.Within its intramural program, NIH in 2018 began inquiries into 35 sexual harassment allegations involving staff or contractors. So far, 20 staff members have been disciplined, half with informal actions including training, and cease and desist warnings, and 10 others with formal actions such as termination of employment.NIH says that after hearing from the working group, the agency now realizes it needs to clarify in its guidance the timeline and reporting requirements that institutions must follow in notifying NIH if an investigator or other grant personnel cannot continue their work because of a sexual harassment investigation or findings. The agency is also working on “additional channels” for individuals to share harassment concerns and released a new email address for reporting them (GranteeHarassment@od.nih.gov). And the agency promises “listening sessions” as part of developing recommendations that the working group and NIH staff will deliver to the ACD at its next meetings in June and December.McLaughlin says the statement reflects a request she made to Collins to apologize to victims as a first step: “We can’t form an action committee before we apologize,” she says. But she thinks NIH should not just move a grant to another PI—often a colleague of the sexual harasser—but “has to start taking that money back from universities.” She thinks it should go into a fund for victims, an idea she is discussing with Collins. “I respect this apology. Let’s get to work,” she says. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country National Institutes of Health apologizes for lack of action on sexual harassers The National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, today responded to ongoing criticism of how the agency handles sexual harassment by NIH-funded investigators by issuing an apology. In a lengthy statement from NIH leaders, replete with language unusually contrite and passionate for a federal agency, NIH says it “has been part of the problem” and vows to take new steps, but does not list any immediate policy changes.  The agency also released data on actions it has recently taken against individuals found guilty of sexual harassment, which in 2018 included removing 14 principal investigators (PIs) from grants.The statement begins by quoting a September 2018 missive from NIH Director Francis Collins calling sexual harassment “morally indefensible,” but goes further by expressing new concerns about reports shared by the #MeTooSTEM movement. They “portray a heartbreaking story of opportunities lost, pain suffered, and a systemic failure to protect and defend. To all those who have endured these experiences, we are sorry that it has taken so long to acknowledge and address the climate and culture that has caused such harm,” the statement says. It continues: “We are concerned that NIH has been part of the problem. We are determined to become part of the solution.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Lydia Polimeni/National Institutes of Health By Jocelyn KaiserFeb. 28, 2019 , 12:30 PM Emaillast_img read more

Cancel Culture A Myth To Silence Marginalized Voices

first_img Sudan Is Burning But People Don’t Care Because It’s Not A Cathedral Let’s look at an abridged list of people who have gotten “canceled” on social media. When it was announced that Kevin Hart would host this year’s Oscars, his old homophobic tweets resurfaced, causing the Academy to demand an apology from him. He refused and was booted from the show. When Louis CK and Aziz Ansari were accused of sexual assault, they responded by taking social media hiatuses. When Kanye West said slavery was a choice and started donning MAGA hats while being chummy with Donald Trump, he was summarily slandered across social media. In most people’s eyes, these men got canceled. But in actuality, nothing really happened to them beyond career inconveniences.Louis CK and Aziz Ansari are both back on the comedy circuit, touring and making money. Kevin Hart dropped a new (awful) Netflix comedy special and Kanye West’s Yeezy sneakers are still selling out every time they’re released. We could go on: R. Kelly was touring pretty much up until the day he was actually arrested; Roseanne – whose show was literally canceled last year due to her rampant racism – returned to standup in March; and so on. The fact is, people just don’t actually get canceled. Their shows might get canceled. Their movies might get shelved. Their albums might get panned but in the grand scheme of things, their lives go on relatively unscathed – especially compared to the marginalized folks they continue to insult.If Kanye’s album had been any good or Kevin Hart’s standup been bearable or R. Kelly had a fire new project, these men would have just as many fans quoting gobbling up their works as before. That’s because, for as many voices that are genuinely outraged by what these people do and say, there are just as many fans who don’t care enough about the LGBT community, black folks, women or anyone else to stop supporting their trash faves. Stop Telling Black Folks To Settle For A Candidate Just To Beat Trump In 2020 Twitter Cancels Source Magazine Over Its Clickbait Nipsey Hussle Murder Video The 2019 Met Gala Celebrating Camp: Notes on Fashion - Street SightingsSource: Gilbert Carrasquillo / GettyThe phrase “cancel culture” has been one of the most popular new things for people to say without really having any clue what it actually means. The prevailing definition of cancel culture is the idea that saying the wrong thing, having old inflammatory tweets or sound bytes resurface or having unpopular political reviews will ultimately result in social media users “canceling” the offending party. To “cancel,” then, is to sic the wrath of social media upon someone with the end result being some sort of catastrophic blow to said person’s career. The prevalence of these “cancel” moments has caused people to characterize the leaders of so-called cancel culture – namely young, marginalized communities – as too sensitive; as always needing to find something to criticize or find fault in. Leading to an idea that free speech is dying at the hands of those pesky millennials. But here’s the problem: cancel culture isn’t an actual thing because nobody really, truly gets canceled. And the continued use of the phrase like it’s some boogeyman is only a thinly-veiled method of marginalizing the people around us who want to vocalize when they and their respective communities are wronged. More By daviddtss cancel culture , Kanye West David Dennis, Jr. is a writer and adjunct professor of Journalism at Morehouse College. David’s writing has appeared in The Guardian, The Smoking Section, Uproxx, Playboy, The Atlantic, Complex.com and wherever people argue about things on the internet.SEE ALSO:Where Are Black Writers Covering Game Of Thrones?The Mueller Report Is A Metaphor For White Power Rapper Nipsey Hussle Killed In Shooting Even though nobody is actually ever canceled, the importance of people who call out the homophobic, racist, ableist, misogynist, etc. etc. among us can’t be understated. The pressure applied to celebrities and those in the public eye from hordes of regular folks and activists is vastly important in articulating what actions will and won’t be accepted by society anymore. Every time someone becomes a trending topic for hate speech and intolerance, it’s a reminder that there will always be people among us who will hold your feet to the fire if you say something that could threaten our lives.At the same time, however, the persistence in people in the public eye to scream “cancel culture” and call marginalized folks too sensitive or themselves intolerant is simply a means to control narratives and live with the freedom of a misogynist, racist or homophobe without consequences. No, society isn’t getting more sensitive, we’re just getting more vocal and using social media as a means to articulate the need for everyone to simply do better. Yelling “cancel culture” when a member of the LGBT community won’t let Kevin Hart off the hook for his homophobia gaslights that person and suggests that demanding the comedian answer for his words is somehow unreasonable. Crying “cancel culture” is simply begging to be as loud and hateful as possible with little recourse.Cancel culture is a myth. The reality is there are more people with amplified voices who are refusing to sit silently while their communities come under attack by those with the social capital to cause harm. When that happens, awareness is raised, people are uncomfortable and hopefully, some are deterred from being trash. But in reality, for the overwhelming majority of instances, nobody actually gets fully canceled or faces life-changing consequences or silencing. They’ll still earn their money, maintain their notoriety and go about their careers relatively unscathed. They’ll just know that there will be folks ready to call them out at every step of the way if they show they haven’t bothered to learn from their transgressions. Dear White People: Make Your White Friends Watch ‘When They See Us’last_img read more

Ambassador Gregoire questions need for electoral reform in Dominica

first_imgShareTweetSharePinDominica’s Commissioner to the OECS, Ambassador Felix GregoireDominica’s Ambassador to the OECS and CARICOM, His Excellency Felix Gregoire has advised the public to avoid getting carried away by electoral reform.He said generally, elections in Dominica are known to be peaceful and free.“I would like to advise that we do not get carried away by electoral reform,” he said. “I share that opinion because of my extensive involvement in the electoral process from 1980.”Gregoire added that given his experience with process, he believes that it has served Dominica.“It is the same electoral process that brought the Freedom Party into power in 1980, the United Workers Party in 1995, the coalition government into power in 2000 and the Labour Party into power in 2004, 2009 and 2014,” he argued.According to him, after each general election, the Chief Elections Officer submits a report to the government and makes recommendation for improvement.“The present government has attempted to implement recommendations made, especially regarding the use of identification cards for voting to enhance the existing laws,” he stated, adding that the the government has cataloged its efforts to have draft laws passed in parliament, “and all Dominicans are aware of the opposition towards these efforts.”He went on to say that when no political party is responsible for the delays experienced in the reform process, “one has to question the source of that information and the intention of those making such false statements.”Gregoire further stated that “every sober” person in Dominica knows what has to be done to remove the names of dead persons on the list of electors.“The elections laws are very clear on this matter and the fact that the soldiers of electoral reform are not doing what is necessary in that regard, begs the question as to whether they are serious or are just interested in having a dead horse to flog, ” he said.Gregoire explained that he had read a copy of the document entitled ‘Interim Report on the Electoral Reform Effort’ by the group comprising of leaders of church, business and civil society.“The copy I have read is not signed and I have not been able to find a signed copy, so I will reserve my comment on that report in the public domain until I have found a signed copy,” he explained.He said meanwhile, as political parties prepare themselves for the next general elections, “I trust that we as law abiding citizens we will conduct ourselves in a manner that will preserve the peace in our beloved country.”While Gregoire insists on the freeness of previous elections, in his statement, he does not mention the issue of fairness which is at the core of ongoing advocacy for electoral reform in Dominica.Ambassador to the OAS and DLP’s campaign manager, Vince Henderson said recently that there was no need for electoral reform in Dominica pointing out that all observer missions to Dominica during previous elections have reported that elections were free and fair.  Henderson was taken to task by the UWP parliamentary opposition and Concerned Citizens Movement, both advocates for electoral reform, for misrepresenting the findings of the Observer  Missions.The report of a mission from the Commonwealth Secretariat which observed the 2014 general election Dominica, concludes that while the election was free for entry and the casting of the ballot, “the election was not necessarily fair, due to: the lack of balance, and in some cases lack of professionalism of the media; the absence of campaign finance regulations and the resultant lack of transparency on financing, coupled with the exponentially increased expense associated with campaigning.”last_img read more

In Brazil useful idiots protest cuts to research and education

first_img By Herton EscobarMay. 17, 2019 , 6:15 AM Demonstrators march in São Paulo, Brazil, on 15 May to protest cuts to research and education, as well as proposed pension changes. Thousands of scientists, educators, and students swamped the streets of Brazil this week to protest cuts in education and research funding. Marches occurred this past Wednesday in all the country’s state capitals and more than 200 other cities, according to media reports. Several public universities, and even some private institutions not directly affected by the budget cuts, canceled classes to allow staff and students to join the demonstrations.“I had never seen anything of this magnitude,” says Fabricio Santos, a professor of genetics and evolution at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, who joined a protest in the city of Belo Horizonte. “It was a lesson in democracy and discontent.”Although there is no official count, organizers estimated the marches attracted hundreds of thousands of people in major cities like São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Belo Horizonte.The rallies were originally called by labor unions, which are protesting changes to Brazil’s social security and pension systems proposed by President Jair Bolsonaro’s administration. 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country In an effort to address economic struggles, Bolsonaro recently announced a series of fiscal restraint measures, including holding back 42% of the science ministry’s investment budget, and about 25% of the ministry of education’s funding for federal universities. Officials also froze more than 3000 scholarships meant to support postgraduate research. The administration suggests it will release those funds if Brazil’s legislature approves the changes to social programs, which government officials say is key to putting the country’s finances in order.Although previous administrations have taken similar steps, the outcry this time was fueled by a series of controversial policies advanced by Bolsonaro, as well as inflammatory remarks he and his appointees have made. Yesterday, for example, Bolsonaro told reporters that the protesters were “useful idiots” and “imbeciles” who were being manipulated by a “smarthead minority” that controls federal universities. And Minister of Education Abraham Weintraub has stirred controversy by threatening to reduce funding for universities that “promoted rackets” instead of improving their academic performance.University employees are also alarmed by a decree, published Wednesday, that gives Bolsonaro’s administration new powers to control the selection of senior administrators in the federal university system. “It’s unbelievable what is happening,” Santos says. “It’s a complete reversal of the principle of academic autonomy.”The freeze on scholarships for graduate students, announced last week, motivated researchers to join the marches, says Nathalie Cella, a biochemist at the University of São Paulo in São Paulo who helped organized the March for Science there in April 2017. Graduate students are a key scientific labor source at Brazil’s public universities, she notes, which produce more than 90% of the country’s scientific output. Cella says, “A lot of people will have to drop out of their research if this situation is not reversed.” In Brazil, ‘useful idiots’ protest cuts to research and educationlast_img read more

Irish lawyer who spat at Air India staff in racist rant found

first_img“I am a f****** international lawyer,” she told the crew and spat at a flight attendant from close range.In a video that had gone viral on social media, the woman was heard saying, “I am working for all your people…for you, an international criminal lawyer. Don’t get any money for it, by the way. But you can’t give me a …glass of wine, is that correct?”Air India had filed an FIR against Burns and she was taken into custody on landing at London’s Heathrow airport. She later pleaded guilty to charges. Related News By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 4, 2019 5:30:07 pm Air India suffered Rs 430 crore loss when Pakistan closed airspace: Hardeep Singh Puri Simon Burne, Simone Burns suicide, Irish lawyer Air India, Air India Irish lawyer video, Air India, Indian Express, latest news In a Mumbai-London Air India flight in November last year, Burns, who has worked with refugees, went on an expletive-ridden racist rant against the flight crew after she was denied more wine in the nine-hour flight. (Screengrab)An Irish lawyer who abused an Air India flight attendant in a racist rant after being refused alcohol on a Mumbai-London flight was found dead at her home in England’s East Sussex on June 1, reported The Telegraph. Simone Burns, 50, is said to have allegedly committed suicide. In April 2019, Burns was sentenced to jail for six months after being found drunk on an aircraft, and two months for assault. She was released from a prison in the UK on May 20.“The body of a woman found at Beachy Head on June 1 has been identified as Simone Burns from Hove,” a Sussex police spokesperson was quoted as saying by The Telegraph. “The death is not being treated as suspicious and the next of kin have been informed. The matter has been passed to the coroner’s officer,” the spokesperson added.In a Mumbai-London Air India flight in November last year, Burns, who has worked with refugees, went on an expletive-ridden racist rant against the flight crew after she was denied more wine in the nine-hour flight. Advertising Advertising DGCA suspends Air India pilot for six months for ‘physical altercation’ with cabin crew member DGCA: ‘Off-duty officials barred from travelling in cockpit’ 20 Comment(s)last_img read more

Express Daily Briefing Chandrayaan2 launch called off after technical snag how Djokovic

first_img Advertising Top News Advertising In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook chandrayaan 2 launch, chandrayaan 2 launch delayed, chandrayaan 2 launch postponed, world cup final, england wins world cup, wimbledon finals, aadhaar card, tenancy act, maratha quota Top news on Monday morning.Chandrayaan-2 launch called off after ‘technical snag’In an anti-climax to the build-up around the historic moment, a keenly awaited launch of India’s Chandrayaan-2 was called off due to a technical snag. The countdown to the launch was stopped at 56 minutes ahead of the scheduled time after scientists detected a problem in the rocket. ISRO did not provide details. NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Tietanic victory: England win World Cup after match and Super Over end in tiesEngland were crowned World Champions after they beat New Zealand in a dramatic final that went into a Super over. The host nation triumphed in the end, not because the Kiwi’s were less talented — both teams ended up equals, not once, but twice.Wimbledon: How Djokovic defended his title in a historic matchLast evenings win marked the fifth time Djokovic won the title at Wimbledon, and his 16th Grand Slam overall. The tight five-setter was the first time a match tie-breaker was needed to decide a singles match in Wimbledon history. It was also the longest singles final in the tournament’s history. An analysis of Djokovic’s game.Fadnavis balances Maratha quota: offers general category fee aid, more seatsOpen category Maharashtra students who fail to get admission in medical colleges for MBBS or post-graduation due to the reservations introduced will be allowed to take admission in private medical colleges, with the government reimbursing the difference in fees. Also, the decrease in seats in the category due to reservation will be compensated by increasing the number of seats. Opinion | A more opaque AadhaarAadhaar undoubtedly is a technical and administrative achievement of an unprecedented scale, and KYC has been one of its more successful use cases. However, the steamrolling of the legislative processes, without heed to the Supreme Court judgment or civil society concerns, appears to be closed-minded and brazen, writes Subhashis Banerjee, professor at IIT Delhi.Draft Model Tenancy Act: What govt proposes for house owners, tenantsThe draft Model Tenancy Act, 2019, released by the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs, lays down the obligations of tenants and landlords and provides for an adjudication mechanism for disputes. The Act will also bring the vacant houses into the rental market and promote the growth of the rental housing segment.Govt readies plan for second wave of asset monetisationThe inter-ministerial committee (IMC) chaired by NITI Aayog CEO Amitabh Kant will soon recommend a second list of PSU assets, including pipelines of GAIL, mobile towers of BSNL and MTNL, and ATMs of state-owned banks, that could be monetised to raise resources for fresh investment by these undertakings.And finally…Women employees in Haryana may soon be able to take care of their children while at work. The state govt has notified draft rules to make a “creche facility” mandatory for every establishment that has 50 or more employees. By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 15, 2019 8:45:32 am Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Researcher Cracks HackerProof Crypto Wallet

first_imgA hardware wallet for virtual currencies with millions of users has been compromised by a 15-year-old security researcher.Saleem Rashid explained how he cracked the firmware on the wallet produced by Ledger in an online post Tuesday.Rashid performed what’s known as a “supply chain” attack. That means a targeted device is compromised before any users get their hands on it.The attack on Ledger’s US$100 Nano S wallet creates a backdoor on the device that generates predetermined wallet addresses and passwords. With that information, a bandit could perform a number of nasty deeds, including sending money from the wallet to the attacker’s account.Rashid informed Ledger of his hack in November. Since then, the company has released a new version of the firmware that’s supposed to address the vulnerability in the Nano S, although it remains unaddressed in another model of the wallet, the Ledger Blue. Rashid’s vulnerability involved Ledger’s wallet implementation — not the security of any of the cryptocurrencies that might be stored in it, emphasized Kees Schouten, the senior director for product at NYIAX.”The security of blockchain transactions themselves are not in doubt or exposed with this hack,” he told TechNewsWorld.”The hack wasn’t the hack of the cryptography,” Latium’s Johnson added. “It was a hack of the wallet provider’s software. If someone had undone the actual cryptography that backs cryptocurrency, then you would have a major problem on your hands.” Shadow Over Wallets Securing the Supply Chain Although the vulnerability discovered by Rashid may cause some concern for user’s of Ledger’s hardware wallet, it’s unlikely to create anxiety among cryptocurrency users in general.”Ledger is a single provider of a hardware wallet. The majority of cryptocurrency users don’t use hardware wallets,” said David Johnson, CEO of Latium, an organization that pays people in cryptocurrencies for completing crowdsourced tasks.”I don’t believe this will have massive ramifications to the cryptocurrency community as a whole,” he told TechNewsWorld.While the attack may not affect the wider cryptocurrency community, it could cast doubt on other hardware wallets, suggested William J. Malik, vice president of infrastructure strategies at Trend Micro.”It implies that all cryptocurrency wallets could be suffering similar vulnerabilities,” he told TechNewsWorld. Serious but Not Criticalcenter_img Although Ledger chose to close the vulnerability in its wallet through a firmware update, tightening its supply chain security may be essential.”No matter how good, secure or safe a solution is, there always are — and always will be — weaknesses that can be used to crack it,” observed Kirill Radchenko, CEO of Paygine.”The question is how expensive it is to close those gaps and to prevent bad guys from using them. In this case, using tamper-proof packaging seems to be quite a sufficient measure that can be easily implemented and that does not affect the product price,” he told TechNewsWorld.”So if a weakness can be efficiently addressed and does not cost a fortune,” Radchenko continued, “there will be no need to change the device itself or its architecture to address the problem.” Cryptocurrency Crypto Still Safe For its part, Ledger discounted the severity of Rashid’s findings.”The issues found are serious (that’s why we highly recommend the update), but NOT critical,” Ledger’s Chief Security Officer Charels Guillemet wrote in an online post. “Funds have not been at risk, and there was no demonstration of any real life attack on our devices.”Any backdoors planted on a wallet using Rashid’s methods would be detected when the device connected with Ledger’s servers to download an application or perform a firmware update, Guillemet explained in a separate “deep dive” post about the hack.Rashid had not yet verified if the firmware upgrade fully addressed his hack, he told Ars Technica, but noted that even if it does, the flawed design of the product makes it likely the attack could be modified to work again. John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John.last_img read more