Scientists discover new kind of bluegreen algae with carbonates in their cells

first_img(Phys.org) — Researchers studying organisms in Mexico’s Lake Alchichica have discovered a new species of cyanobacterium that unlike any other ever found, has bony, intracellular carbonates. Up till now, specimens with such mineral deposits in their systems have, as the team explains in their paper published in the journal Science, had them on the outsides of their cells. More information: Science 27 April 2012: Vol. 336 no. 6080 pp. 459-462 DOI: 10.1126/science.1216171 Cyanobacterium, known more widely as blue-green algae, are a major part of planet Earth’s many varied geochemical cycles. They take in carbon dioxide and give back oxygen and are believed to have been one of the driving forces that led to the evolution of other types of organisms that survive by breathing the oxygen they provide. Up till now, many types of cyanobacterium have been identified, both in the present and in the historical record, that have carbonate material on the outer edges of their cells that researchers believe is the result of ocean chemistry changes that caused the microbes to precipitate minerals out of their cells leading to calcified crystals.This new species however, appears to be working in a wholly different way. Instead of the carbonate material building up as the cyanobacterium purge minerals from their cells, they appear to be using the bony material as a means of allowing them to anchor themselves to rocks on the bottom of the lake.Because the mineral material – made up of calcium, magnesium, barium, carbonate and strontium (similar to that found in coral) found inside the tiny organisms is not the same percentagewise as minerals in its local environment, the researchers believe the newfound species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, is somehow able to manipulate the minerals inside its cells to produce the optimal bonelike material that allows the cyanobacterium to sit on rocks and other structures at the bottom of the lake, thus, providing them with a unique niche in which to survive.Also, because it is not yet known whether the bony material inside the cells of the new species of cyanobacterium disperses when they die, researchers are considering the possibility that their new find may have played a role in early Earth history that until now, has never been identified. If the carbonates dissolve upon death, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora would not have left any evidence of its existence behind.The next step in the research will be of course to find out if the mineral structures inside their cells do disperse when they die, and then to discern if they may help fill in some of the many gaps that still exist in the ancient history of our planet. Explore further © 2012 Phys.Org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Science Citation: Scientists discover new kind of blue-green algae with carbonates in their cells (2012, April 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-scientists-kind-blue-green-algae-carbonates.html Mars’ missing carbon dioxide may be buriedlast_img read more

Uganda looks for new avenues with KVIC

first_imgA six-member delegation led by Goodwill Ambassador of Uganda to India Renu Varun, recently met Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC) Chairman Vinai Kumar Saxena at his Gandhi Darshan office in Rajghat here and thanked him for the Gandhi Charkha gifted by KVIC – for the Gandhi Heritage Site at Jinja in UgandaTalking with the Chairman, the Goodwill Ambassador also invited him to visit the site in Uganda, where the Gandhian Charkha had been displayed. “In the backdrop of the ‘Gandhi Charakha’ that arrived for the first time ever on the East African soil on the shores of River Nile where Mahatma Gandhi’s ashes were sprinkled and the fact that Uganda is a fine cotton producing country, the Uganda Government underscores the need to support the development of the private sector to become an engine for growth.Since Uganda has an extensive micro, small and medium enterprise (MSME) sub-sector which accounts for approximately 90 percent of the private sector, innovative KVIC programmes like ‘Honey Mission’, ‘Kachchi Ghani oil,’ Tailoring, candle making, spinning and weaving activities can be a vehicle through which the rural poor and the jobless Ugandans can transform themselves tomorrow,” she said, adding, “Uganda eagerly waits to collaborate with KVIC, to fetch some productive output as it can add value to the economy of Uganda.”Meanwhile, the Corroborating similar views, the other delegates including Sheba Kyobutungi (Head, Implementation Youth Desk), Lucy Nakyobe (Permanent Secretary), Lillian Ester Sebedduka (Head, Security Forces Desk), Seruyange Susan (Ministry of Defence, Senior Social Development Officer) and Faridah Nassali (Manager, Presidential Initiative) also said that they were overwhelmed to see the KVIC programmes and its impact on job creation, particularly for women.The delegates, selected by the Ministry of External Affairs, have been invited to India to study the various women empowerment projects being run by KVIC. The delegation also visited the multi-disciplinary training centre of KVIC and spoke to the trainees at incense stick making, tailoring, designing and other units.last_img read more