Netflix picks up US rights to Eurovision

first_img Tags Post a comment TV and Movies Share your voice 0 50 Photos Croatia’s entry to the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest. Thomas Hanses/Eurovision Time to bust out the eye glitter — Netflix has snagged the rights to one of the world’s longest-running live TV events, confirming that it will air the 2019 and 2020 Eurovision Song Contest broadcasts in the US. While Netflix will not air the competition live, it’s a big win for US fans who were left without an official channel to watch the contest this year.It also marks an interesting shift into event television for the company, which has long stuck to movies, TV series and its own original produced content. While Netflix won’t air the broadcasts live, picking up a live show that draws as many as 200 million viewers around the world could herald a bigger shift for the streaming company.Eurovision: the contest that spawned a thousand Epic Sax Guy memes. Eurovision Under the deal, Netflix picks up the US video-on-demand rights to the two Eurovision semifinals and the grand final. All three broadcasts from the 2019 contest will land on Netflix on Monday, July 22. Netflix will also air the semifinals and grand final in 2020, after the live broadcast, though it has not confirmed dates.If you haven’t heard of Eurovision, you’re officially missing one of the greatest (and kitschiest) television events in the world. The song contest catapulted Celine Dion and ABBA to stardom, brought the world Volare (the Italian-chorus classic made famous by Dean Martin) and regularly serves up everything from ear-worm pop bangers, to death-metal demons and singing grandmas.You can read CNET’s full guide to Eurovision 2019 here. 2019 TV shows you can’t miss Netflixlast_img read more

Houstons Only Hang Gliding School In Danger Of Shutting Down

first_img X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen You may have never thought of hang gliding as being a thing here in Houston. We’re not exactly known for our hilly landscape.But as it turns out, you don’t need mountains to glide through the air — a tow plane will do.Cowboy Up Hang Gliding has been operating in Wharton, about 1.5 hours southwest of downtown Houston, since 2013.“The airplane is towing the hang glider up to altitude, so to 1,000, 2,000, 3,000 feet – however high you would like to go,” said founder and owner Tiki Mashy. “And then once you get to that altitude, the hang glider releases itself from tow and then you fly around the area, and then you come back and you land where you started from.”Business was good, she said, until Hurricane Harvey struck the Texas Gulf Coast in August 2017.“It impacted our business in that people didn’t have the disposable income to come and do a recreational sport,” she said. “And when that stream dried up, our bills coming in didn’t dry up.”She relied on savings to get her business through the challenging time.But now that the business is barely back in the black, Mashy is having to deal with a new issue: Her partner will be leaving Cowboy Up in April, which is a big blow to the business.“This business counts on two of us, two pilots working in tandem to service one customer,” she said. “So when one pilot leaves it’s impossible for that business model to work anymore.”Finding a new partner is proving very difficult, because that person needs to have experience teaching hang gliding, be able to fly the plane and know how to work on the engine and equipment.“Looking for that person in my industry is extremely difficult and I want to find the right person,” Mashy said.Until she can find that person, Mashy wants to buy a self-powered hang glider so that she wouldn’t have to rely on a tow plane anymore.In order to do that, she has started a Go Fund Me campaign, and as of Thursday night had already raised nearly $18,000 of her $49,000 goal.And once she finds another partner?“When that happens, the business will have expanded and I will be able to do both, I’ll be able to use both resources,” Mashy said. “But until then I have to be a one-person operation.”Click on the audio above to listen to the interview with Tiki Mashy.center_img 00:00 /03:44 Florian Martin/Houston Public MediaTiki Mashy operates Cowboy Up Hang Gliding in Wharton County. She has done hang gliding since 1980 and holds several world records in the sport. Sharelast_img read more

McDuffie Bill Prohibits Employment Credit Checks

first_imgKenyan McDuffie represents Ward 5 on the D.C. Council.D.C. Council member Kenyan McDuffie (D-Ward 5) is the chief author of a bill to prohibit credit checks of potential employees until a conditional offer is made. He introduced the bill, The Fair Credit History Steering Act of 2015 to his colleagues on June 2. McDuffie wants to use the legislation as a vehicle to help more District residents obtain employment.“This bill will abolish restrictions that unjustly exacerbate challenges faced by applicants who are already having difficulty with finding employment and making ends meet,” McDuffie said. “As a result, we will create economic opportunities for more of our vulnerable residents.”The Fair Credit bill will prohibit an employer from considering a job applicant’s credit history during the hiring process, and will restrict an employer’s inquiry into an applicant’s credit history until after a conditional offer of employment. The bill would allow certain employers exemptions from enforcement, like financial institutions.The legislation establishes a complaint process for aggrieved potential employees and a penalties component for alleged employer violators. The D.C. Office of Human Rights would be responsible for enforcing the bill.According to a May 2013 online article, “Discredited: How Employment Checks Keep Qualified Workers Out of a Job” by Amy Traub,  one in 10 people who are unemployed have been informed that they would not be hired because of negative credit report information. The article, cited by McDuffie in a statement, showed that one in seven denied job applicants were advised that they were not hired because of their credit. The article also showed that people of color and the chronically unemployed are adversely affected when their jobs search depends on creditworthiness.D.C. Council members Brandon Todd (D-Ward 4), Yvette Alexander (D-Ward 7), LaRuby May (D-Ward 7), Vincent Orange (D-At Large),  Charles Allen (D-Ward 6), Elissa Silverman (I-At Large) and Brianne Nadeau (D-Ward 1) have indicated favorable interest in McDuffie’s bill. Todd, who reportedly declared bankruptcy earlier in his life, thinks this bill is needed.“I strongly believe that past mistakes should not prohibit our residents from attaining future success,” Todd said. “This legislation will provide those with perseverance and discipline an opportunity for a fresh start.”Doyle Mitchell, the president and CEO of Industrial Bank, one of the country’s largest Black-owned banks, said Industrial conducts credit checks for potential employees. “We would not turn somebody down solely based on poor credit,” Mitchell said. “It is part of the application process because our employees handle large amounts of cash.”Thomas Penny, the general manager of the Courtyard by Marriott Convention Center in downtown Washington, said that as a matter of policy, they don’t conduct credit checks until a conditional offer is made, which is what McDuffie’s bill mandates. “When we do a credit check, it is position-specific,” Penny said. “If a potential employee will be working in the food and beverage area or housekeeping, credit is not as critical as if they are handling cash. We handle these matters on a case-by-case basis.”Both Mitchell and Penny say they have hired some people with less than perfect credit because they felt that the applicant would be a good, trustworthy employee.Harry Wingo, the president and CEO of the D.C. Chamber of Commerce, said that he and his staff are examining McDuffie’s legislation. “We at the chamber support any effort to remove barriers to employment,” Wingo said. “However, we have to look at hard at any effort to restrict businesses in the operation of their businesses.”Wingo said that background checks, whether credit or character, are vital for a business to determine the best applicant for a particular job. “We look forward to working with McDuffie on the details of this bill,” he said.D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser (D) said that she hasn’t read McDuffie’s bill but will approach with an open mind. “I am always looking for ways for people to get jobs,” Bowser said. “My ears are always open for that.”last_img read more

Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Tuesday August 29

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3uLuke Broadwater, of the Baltimore Sun reports on today’s meeting between Gov. Larry Hogan and city criminal justice leaders about Baltimore’s soaring homicide rate. Also, 84-year old Min. Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam, recently proclaimed Jesus as his Redeemer, seemingly breaking from the group he has led for decades in a fundamental way. We’ll play excerpts from Farrakhan’s startling video declaration and open the phone lines…410.319.8888!These stories and much more on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes, Monday through Friday, 5-7 p.m.last_img read more

Scientists discover new kind of bluegreen algae with carbonates in their cells

first_img(Phys.org) — Researchers studying organisms in Mexico’s Lake Alchichica have discovered a new species of cyanobacterium that unlike any other ever found, has bony, intracellular carbonates. Up till now, specimens with such mineral deposits in their systems have, as the team explains in their paper published in the journal Science, had them on the outsides of their cells. More information: Science 27 April 2012: Vol. 336 no. 6080 pp. 459-462 DOI: 10.1126/science.1216171 Cyanobacterium, known more widely as blue-green algae, are a major part of planet Earth’s many varied geochemical cycles. They take in carbon dioxide and give back oxygen and are believed to have been one of the driving forces that led to the evolution of other types of organisms that survive by breathing the oxygen they provide. Up till now, many types of cyanobacterium have been identified, both in the present and in the historical record, that have carbonate material on the outer edges of their cells that researchers believe is the result of ocean chemistry changes that caused the microbes to precipitate minerals out of their cells leading to calcified crystals.This new species however, appears to be working in a wholly different way. Instead of the carbonate material building up as the cyanobacterium purge minerals from their cells, they appear to be using the bony material as a means of allowing them to anchor themselves to rocks on the bottom of the lake.Because the mineral material – made up of calcium, magnesium, barium, carbonate and strontium (similar to that found in coral) found inside the tiny organisms is not the same percentagewise as minerals in its local environment, the researchers believe the newfound species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, is somehow able to manipulate the minerals inside its cells to produce the optimal bonelike material that allows the cyanobacterium to sit on rocks and other structures at the bottom of the lake, thus, providing them with a unique niche in which to survive.Also, because it is not yet known whether the bony material inside the cells of the new species of cyanobacterium disperses when they die, researchers are considering the possibility that their new find may have played a role in early Earth history that until now, has never been identified. If the carbonates dissolve upon death, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora would not have left any evidence of its existence behind.The next step in the research will be of course to find out if the mineral structures inside their cells do disperse when they die, and then to discern if they may help fill in some of the many gaps that still exist in the ancient history of our planet. Explore further © 2012 Phys.Org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Science Citation: Scientists discover new kind of blue-green algae with carbonates in their cells (2012, April 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-scientists-kind-blue-green-algae-carbonates.html Mars’ missing carbon dioxide may be buriedlast_img read more

RRI to celebrate Rash Behari Boses 100th marriage anniv

first_imgKolkata: The Rashbehari Research Institute (RRI) based in Chandannagore is celebrating 100 years of marriage anniversary of Rash Behari Bose and his Japanese wife Toshiko in a befitting manner.”100 years have passed and the duo has kept proving real love. Rash Behari Bose and Toshiko are connected by heart and promised each other to stay together for the rest of their life. Hence, we have decided to make this 100 years of marriage anniversary special,” said Kalyan Chakraborty, the director of RRI. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThe RRI in association with some of their friends based in Japan has arranged an exhibition, which is aimed at boosting the cultural bond between the two countries.The two-day exhibition that kicked off on Monday at Rashbehari auditorium in Chandannagore, Hooghly district will showcase large Kimano (Japanese dress), Yukata (Japanese dress), Japanese dolls, Japanese paintings, rare Japanese books etc. Nakamuraya Curry hat was introduced by Bose in Japan in the late 1920’s and Japanese Black & White Rice will also be exhibited. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPThe exhibition will be followed by a Japanese Film Festival and films on freedom movement in the evening.The love life of Rash Behari Bose was brief with the sudden death of his Japanese wife Toshiko, who died of tuberculosis in 1925 only at the age of 28.Married in July 1918, Toshiko had accepted the life of a social outcast and shouldered all domestic responsibility so that Bose can pursue his goal of Indian freedom struggle with dedication.When Bose’s mother-in-law had proposed him to marry again as Toshiko died leaving two young children, Bose said it was impossible for him to love anyone else other than Toshiko. Rash Behari Bose, who has been instrumental in doing the spadework for the legendary organisation of Indian National Army or INA, had sacrificed his job as an officer of the British Raj (he worked as the head clerk at the Forest Research Institute in Dehradun) to join the IndianRevolutionary struggle.”He has been an unsung hero of India’s freedom struggle and 16 books written in Japanese by Bose is yet to be translated in local language. We will urge research scholars to come forward in this venture so that many unknown facts of his eventful life can come to light,” Chakraborty said.last_img read more

March 21 2000 Shirlee Wheeler answers the phone c

first_imgMarch 21, 2000Shirlee Wheeler answers the phone calls coming into the Arcosanti office. Sheis also one of the “Community Leaders” who are working to develop a better relationshipbetween residents and the onsitecoordinators. Photo by: DoctressNeutopialast_img

August 10 2018 When in doubt play it out Seeing

first_imgAugust 10, 2018When in doubt, play it out. Seeing as summer is nearing its close, this past Thursday night, a number of Arcosanti Residents gathered for a few friendly games of soccer in the Vaults. With enough people for more than two teams of five people, the residents found themselves having to make teams of three just so that everyone could get some play time in such a confined space. By the end of the games everyone was glistening with sweat, of course there were a couple of slight injuries here and there, but overall everyone had a fantastic time. There were many people left with the feeling of wanting more, so without a doubt, there will be another soccer game or two before it gets too chilly, and hopefully we will see you all out there for the next game!last_img read more

European movie channel Eurochannel has launched in

first_imgEuropean movie channel Eurochannel has launched in Croatia on Telekom Austria-owned pay TV service Vip TV, part of Vipnet. Eurochannel is available in the operator’s basic package. All Eurochannel programs are presented with Croatian subtitles.Eurochannel is offering Vip TV subscribers a selection of 75 premium European movies and TV series to kick off the launch, the company said. In November, Croatian viewers will also ber able to view action series Strike Force.Gustavo Vainstein, Eurochannel’s CEO said: “As part of our constant expansion across Europe, we are thrilled to start offering Eurochannel in Croatia thanks to Vipnet. Now, all Croatians can enjoy the exclusive and premium movies and TV Series of Eurochannel in a Croatian localised version. We are also immensely proud to be the first broadcaster of Croatian production in foreign markets.”Nikola Francetic, head of content, media and broadcasting at Telekom Austria Group,said: “We are very proud to announce Eurochannel is now part of Vipnet’s new convergent ‘SVE’ Everything offer – for the first time offered and fully localised for the Croatian market. Vipnet, as a part of Telekom Austria Group, is focused on providing our subscribers the best of TV experience – and our cooperation with Eurochannel, the award winning worldwide leading European cinema TV channel, is uniquely suited to provide our subscribers with the best of entertainment.”last_img read more

Following the announcement that Scripps Networks h

first_imgFollowing the announcement that Scripps Networks has acquired a 50% stake in UKTV, Bob Baskerville spoke to Graham Pomphrey about what the deal means to the channel operator’s international strategy.When Scripps Networks announced that it had acquired UK cable operator Virgin Media’s 50% stake in UKTV, the joint venture channels business partly owned by BBC Worldwide, it sent out a clear message that the US-based channel operator means business in the UK, and further afield.According to Scripps’ international general manager Bob Baskerville, while the deal will see Scripps bringing its expertise in lifestyle programming to the table, the relationship with BBC Worldwide will give the company some “global clout” as it forges ahead with its international expansion plans.In Europe, the UK has been Scripps’s key market, where its Food Network channel is carried by every platform, bar Virgin Media. The fact that UKTV operates its own successful food channel, Good Food, is no concern to Baskerville, who says that if the US is anything to go by, the UK market is big enough for two food channels. “The ratings for both Food Network UK and Good Food shows that there is room for two food channels in that territory. In fact, a fair amount of the content that performs well on Good Food is from Scripps,” he says.In the US, the broadcaster operates two food channels, with the Cooking Channel (formerly Fine Living) sitting alongside the Food Network in its portfolio; its other channels being home-based networks HGTV and DIY, the Travel Channel and country music channel GAC.Internationally, food is proving to be a winning genre, something Baskerville puts down to the fact that everyone can relate to it, and its potential to touch areas including travel and competition. The Food Network has established a clear presence in the UK by offering predominantly US-produced programming. But over the next few months it will introduce its first locally-produced content, in the form of Andy Bates’ Street Food and Reza’s Indian Food Palaces. “We recognise that long term we need to build a channel that resonates on a more personal level with the people that live in that market and what matters to them in terms of their food.”The UK was an obvious starting point for Scripps’s European development due to the lack of a language barrier. It is now hoping to replicate the model of launching with original US content, building a presence and developing local productions across the rest of Europe, which is currently serviced by a regional Food Network feed. In total, the channel has a presence in 81 EMEA countries. “We’ve seen some great growth in the UK and would like to speed up the growth in other parts of Europe,” says Baskerville. “The market is tough but we have one of the strongest channel presences that you could have in terms of brand equity with the food network.”Aside from its tent-pole channel, Scripps has also launched lifestyle channel Fine Living Network in some European markets, despite the fact that it no longer airs the channel in the US. Domestically, says Baskerville, the channel was too broad for a TV market that prefers closely defined lifestyle genres, hence its rebrand as the Cooking Channel.Internationally, however, Scripps is using the channel brand to deliver a ‘best of’ line-up of programming from its various US channels. Baskerville says the subjective nature of the home genre means domestically produced programming may not resonate so well internationally. “It leads me to believe that there is a fair amount of domestically produced home and garden content that may not resonate as well globally as food content,” he says. But that’s not to say there isn’t anything of interest, “Aspirational and voyeuristic types of shows work all around the world,” he adds. “Fine Living can tap into the home category. It can be what we were reluctant to do in the US and that is to make it a little broader but still interesting. We can even add a bit of travel and even a bit of food. There is a lot of opportunity for it.” The channel is currently available in 59 countries in the EMEA region.Another brand Scripps is looking to launch internationally is the Travel Channel, which it acquired from Cox Communications almost two years ago. However, Baskerville and his team is taking a longer-term view and will not rush to market with a “half-baked” offering. “It took a long time to build the Food Network and that helped us make a relatively smooth transition in taking it to the UK. We’ll take a bit more time with the Travel Channel. Rest assured we are discussing it quite a bit,” says  Baskerville.last_img read more