Netflix picks up US rights to Eurovision

first_img Tags Post a comment TV and Movies Share your voice 0 50 Photos Croatia’s entry to the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest. Thomas Hanses/Eurovision Time to bust out the eye glitter — Netflix has snagged the rights to one of the world’s longest-running live TV events, confirming that it will air the 2019 and 2020 Eurovision Song Contest broadcasts in the US. While Netflix will not air the competition live, it’s a big win for US fans who were left without an official channel to watch the contest this year.It also marks an interesting shift into event television for the company, which has long stuck to movies, TV series and its own original produced content. While Netflix won’t air the broadcasts live, picking up a live show that draws as many as 200 million viewers around the world could herald a bigger shift for the streaming company.Eurovision: the contest that spawned a thousand Epic Sax Guy memes. Eurovision Under the deal, Netflix picks up the US video-on-demand rights to the two Eurovision semifinals and the grand final. All three broadcasts from the 2019 contest will land on Netflix on Monday, July 22. Netflix will also air the semifinals and grand final in 2020, after the live broadcast, though it has not confirmed dates.If you haven’t heard of Eurovision, you’re officially missing one of the greatest (and kitschiest) television events in the world. The song contest catapulted Celine Dion and ABBA to stardom, brought the world Volare (the Italian-chorus classic made famous by Dean Martin) and regularly serves up everything from ear-worm pop bangers, to death-metal demons and singing grandmas.You can read CNET’s full guide to Eurovision 2019 here. 2019 TV shows you can’t miss Netflixlast_img read more

The Next Crisis Even with the largest bidder in

first_img The Next Crisis Even with the largest bidder in the world on their side, investors can still panic. That would mean a big drop in asset prices, high-profile bankruptcies, and a new crisis. Things move fast. The feds may step in with more QE buying, but they may be a dollar short and a day late. A 20% drop in stock prices is equal to a loss of about $5 trillion in the U.S. alone. The bond market is roughly twice the size of the stock market, so add a 20% drop there and you’re talking real money – a total loss of $15 trillion… which could easily happen in a few days. Now, imagine a drop similar to the 2008-09 plunge… In round numbers, equities lost 50%. Today, there’s about $60 trillion worth of stocks worldwide, so that would be a $30 trillion loss. If the bond market fell in sync, you’d be looking at another $60 trillion or so… or a total loss of market capital of $90 trillion. What would the feds do? Yes, they would buy stocks and bonds. But they would buy at market prices. Owners would still take big losses. And the feds wouldn’t stop there. We are now almost eight years into the central bank’s various “stimulus” programs; they have coincided with the weakest recovery on record. After taking account of inflation, incomes for most Americans are lower today than they were in 2007. Clearly, reducing the cost of credit doesn’t work – even with yields on roughly $13 trillion worth of bonds in negative territory. Fire Up the Whirlybirds So what’s next? When the next crisis hits, central bankers will rush back into their tool rooms and bring out something new. It will no doubt include “helicopter money.” This is the term economist Milton Friedman used to describe direct giveaways of newly minted money without any corresponding increase in the government’s budget deficit. Huge new infrastructure projects will be announced. Tax credits, tax cuts, minimum guarantee incomes – we don’t know what the feds will come up with. But watch out… With the carrot will come the sticks. The feds will impose measures to crack down on tax cheats, tighten the noose on black-market operators, and shut off funds to causes they don’t like. They’ll use their money helicopters to “drone” you. That is, they’ll make sure you do with your money as they please. Mr. Rogoff’s nutty suggestion to restrict cash could become law. Regards, – BREAKING: Steve Sjuggerud launches new product We just discovered a “backdoor” into the world’s most profitable technology stocks. Most people think you need to get in early to make huge gains in Silicon Valley… but there’s actually a much easier and much more predictable way. Learn more. — Recommended Linkscenter_img Don’t touch Gold until you see this A radical new method for gold investing could make you 5 TIMES more money than bullion… beginning with just 60 cents. Details here. Bill Editor’s note: The “War on Cash” is already in full swing… Italy, Spain, Mexico, and Russia have all banned large cash transactions. The European Central Bank just killed the €500 bill. Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Larry Summers wants the U.S. government to end the $100 bill. Eventually, governments want to eliminate all paper cash. In other words, they want to trap your money in the digital banking system. This will allow the government to track, control, and “tax” your money at will. Now, the average person won’t surrender their financial privacy without a fight. We expect millions of people to pull cash out of their bank account and put it into gold, the ultimate “underground currency.” This could send gold prices through the roof. If you don’t own gold already, we recommend you get started immediately. But first, we urge you to watch this presentation. It explains how to take advantage of a little-known “loophole” in the gold market. In short, we may have found the cheapest way to buy gold coins in America today. Click here to learn more. Editor’s note: Governments have tried anything and everything to stimulate the economy since 2008. They’ve cut interest rates hundreds of times. They’ve printed trillions of dollars. Some governments have even adopted “negative interest rates.” Dispatch readers know these radical measures have failed miserably. But that won’t stop the government from continuing to experiment during the next financial crisis. Today, Agora founder Bill Bonner reveals what the government could do when the next crisis hits. Unlike previous measures, this new policy could directly target the money in your wallet. [This essay was originally published on September 12, 2016, in Bill Bonner’s Diary.] OUZILLY, France – We came back from South America poorer but wiser. For the first time ever, we have had to face the reality of politics; up until now, it was never more than an abstract, theoretical matter. We read about the French Revolution, the Bolshevik Revolution, and the passage of Obamacare. We knew politics was corrupt and repulsive. But except for a brief stint on the board of governors of our local church, we had nothing to do with it. Now the wolf is in our own backyard… so close that we can smell its hot breath and hear the clicking of its pearly teeth as it snaps at our heels. More as it develops… Criminalizing Cash But wait… money sometimes goes “full politics,” too. Take poor Kenneth Rogoff at Harvard. He wants a dollar with a voter registration card, a U.S. flag on its windshield, and a handgun in its belt – the kind of money that supports the Establishment and votes for Hillary. Writing last month in the Wall Street Journal under the headline, “The Sinister Side of Cash,” he noted that “paper currency, especially large notes such as the U.S. $100 bill, facilitates crime: racketeering, extortion, money laundering, drug and human trafficking, the corruption of public officials, not to mention terrorism.” Of course, large notes do make it easier for criminals to operate. Like cellphones. And sunglasses. And automobiles with air-conditioning. But that’s what money is supposed to do: make it easier for an economy to function. You use it as you please. Yes, dear reader, we are back to our regular beat. Money. But what’s this? Finally, we’re beginning to see some action. You’ll recall that the markets have been eerily quiet… with less movement in stocks than we’ve seen in the last 100 years. What gives? Perhaps it was the calm before the storm. The Dow fell nearly 400 points on Friday. We don’t know. It could be the calm before the storm. Or it could be the calm before more calm. How It All Ends There’s something fundamentally tranquilizing about having a central bank that gives out the word that it’s got your back. The Bank of Japan is buying bonds AND stocks (by way of exchange-traded funds)… pushing up prices for both. Under its €1.7 trillion ($1.9 trillion) QE program, the European Central Bank bought so many government bonds, it ran out of new bonds to buy. So, this summer, it added corporate bonds to its shopping list. According to Reuters, it will soon run out of corporate bonds, too. Then it will have to follow the Bank of Japan’s lead… and wade into the stock market… if it wants to keep its QE program going. And in the U.S., the Yellen Fed continues to jive and diddle… teasing investors with the threat of “normalizing” interest rates, but having neither the desire nor the fortitude to act. We’ve been wondering how it ends. Bear markets are facts of life. But if the central bank has set its face to stopping them, then what? Central banks – in the current system – can create unlimited amounts of fake money. They can use this money to buy real financial assets. Theoretically, they could buy all the world’s stocks and bonds. And theoretically, they can leave the feds with almost complete ownership of the planet’s capital. The rich get richer (selling their assets to the feds at inflated prices). The poor get poorer (as the misallocation of capital increases… price signals are distorted… and real wealth is wasted). What goes wrong? Everything. As in politics, the gap between theory and practice is as wide as the Sargasso Sea.last_img read more

CTF along with NTAP and Sage announce firstever open data portal for

All content in the NF Data Portal is compatible with global scientific initiatives to establish common vocabularies and protocols for sharing data across all diseases. Furthermore, the NF Data Portal hosts analysis tools to integrate different modalities of data including drug efficacy across model systems, drug-target analysis, clinical trial data, and molecular adaptive responses in patients. The datasets coming from funded research are subject to a short embargo period (generally up to 18 months), during which the researchers will use the Data Portal for their own research before releasing the dataset to the research community under a Creative Commons (CC) license, or similar. The user-centered design approach employed by Sage Bionetworks for the NF Data Portal enables more users to easily find and access the data they need.As the portal evolves and grows, it will include data from other significant research programs, such as the CDMRP-NF program (Congressionally Directed Medial Research Programs in Neurofibromatosis), as well as other funders of NF research. All are welcome to participate.”We are very excited to have attracted the most important funders of NF research in order to enhance and expand use of the NF Data Portal, and to be working with Sage Bionetworks, which possesses the expertise to build what we consider to be the most promising model of data-sharing in the rare disease area,” said Salvatore La Rosa, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer of the Children’s Tumor Foundation.Sara Gosline, PhD, Senior Scientist at Sage Bionetworks and lead of the NF Open Science Initiative, added, “Through our work with CTF and NTAP we have been able to capture an unprecedented amount of data across the NF community that will undoubtedly fuel further scientific discoveries in this field.”La Rosa concluded, “This is big news for researchers, but ultimately even bigger news for patients, who can be assured that critical information is being shared openly so that treatments can be developed as quickly as possible.”Source: https://www.ctf.org/news/open-science-and-data-initiative-announced-for-neurofibromatosis Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 17 2018The Children’s Tumor Foundation (CTF), together with the Neurofibromatosis Therapeutic Acceleration Program (NTAP) and Sage Bionetworks (Sage), has announced the first-ever open data portal for scientific research results in the field of neurofibromatosis (NF). The NF Data Portal marks the major first milestone in all three organizations’ commitment to the development of the larger NF Open Science Initiative (NF-OSI), which draws experts from across research disciplines and disease areas in order to develop treatments for NF, a genetic disorder which affects 2.5 million people worldwide (1 in 3,000 births), and currently has no cure or effective treatment options.The unique challenge for researchers studying NF, and particularly for patients living with the disease, is that NF is extremely variable. It causes tumors to grow on nerves throughout the body, and can cause deafness, blindness, disfigurement, bone abnormalities, learning disabilities, disabling pain and cancer. This makes diagnosis and treatment particularly difficult, and as a result, many patients are told to ‘watch and wait’ as their tumors grow. Researchers working on the disease have likewise faced the challenge of working in independent groups and relying primarily on data made public through published works.The Children’s Tumor Foundation looked to turn this ‘traditional research model’ on its head, and in 2014 launched the NF Open Science Initiative, in collaboration with Sage Bionetworks, in order to enable CTF sponsored project teams to share their data in real-time through Sage Bionetworks’ Synapse platform. This was started in connection with the Foundation’s Synodos research model, which brings together multidisciplinary experts from leading institutions and across basic, translational and clinical disciplines, in order to solve complex NF issues.This spirit of collaboration has attracted other significant partners, and in 2015, CTF committed to supporting data collection and integration from a large National Cancer Institute (NCI) project, called DHART SPORE (Developmental and HyperActive Ras Tumor Specialized Programs of Research Excellence). That same year, NTAP initiated a relationship with Sage requiring that data generated through NTAP funded initiatives be uploaded, harmonized and indexed within Synapse. Across all of these projects – from CTF to NTAP to the NCI – Sage Bionetworks interacts directly with the project scientists to coordinate data upload and organization, and applies expertise in computational biology, oncology, data harmonization, and community-building to expand and enhance the value of the data generated across all of these initiatives.Building on the success of these efforts, CTF, NTAP and Sage have formally aligned to launch the NF Data Portal and the NF Open Science Initiative to support:Related StoriesResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancer computational biologists seeking to analyze NF data and run their analyses, bench scientists who are interested in seeing what models/studies have been carried out on NF-related models, clinicians interested in seeing if a compound of interest has been used in an in-vivo, in-vitro or an in-silico model, and the general public who are interested in reading about what symptoms of NF are currently being studied. read more

Depression screening does not improve quality of life in heart attack patients

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 18 2019After suffering a heart attack or unstable angina (chest pain caused by blocked arteries), patients who were systematically screened for depression and referred for treatment when appropriate did not show a significant improvement in quality of life compared with those who received no depression screening, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session.Experts have identified depression as a risk factor for heart disease. Previous studies estimate that at least 1 in 5 patients with acute coronary syndromes also have symptoms of depression, and there is evidence that depression after a cardiac event can dramatically raise the risk of subsequent heart problems and death for any reason. The new trial suggests using currently available questionnaires to screen patients for depression after a heart attack or unstable angina is not an effective way to reduce the toll depression takes on patients’ quality of life. However, the findings leave open the possibility that other ways of addressing depression could be more effective, according to researchers.”Based on this study and the best evidence we have, we don’t see a justification for putting large amounts of resources into universal, systematic depression screening for these patients,” said Ian Matthew Kronish, MD, Florence Irving Associate Professor of Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center and the study’s lead author. “However, that doesn’t mean physicians shouldn’t be on the lookout for signs of depression or that, if they notice it, they should ignore it. Depression still has a major impact on patients’ quality of life and prognosis overall, and if physicians do find it, they should absolutely try to address it with treatments that can reduce the depressive symptoms.”Researchers enrolled just over 1,500 patients hospitalized within the previous two to 12 months for acute coronary syndromes, a group of conditions that includes heart attacks and unstable angina, at four U.S. medical centers. Patients were randomly assigned to three groups. The first group received no depression screening. The other patients were asked to complete the eight-item Patient Health Questionnaire, a questionnaire designed to identify depression. For half of these patients, a positive screen resulted in notification of both the patient and his or her primary care provider, along with an invitation to participate in depression care. For the other half, a positive screen resulted only in notification of the patient and the patient’s primary care provider, leaving the provider to determine next steps regarding depression treatment.Overall the study identified depression in about 7 percent of patients screened. This is somewhat lower than seen in previous studies that found major depression affects about 10 percent of acute coronary syndrome patients. This was due, in part, to the fact that people who were already being treated for depression and those with a history of depression were excluded from the study, Kronish said. Also, depressive symptoms were assessed at least two months after the acute coronary syndrome; depressive symptoms that are elevated immediately after acute coronary syndromes often go away without depression treatment.Related StoriesHeart disease is still the number 1 killer in Australia, according to latest figuresTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockPerinatal depression screenings may overlook women having suicidal ideationThe researchers followed participants for 18 months and assessed changes in their quality of life based on quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), the trial’s primary endpoint. QALYs capture the degree to which a person’s life is detrimentally affected by physical or mental disability over time, with one point representing one year of perfect health and zero points representing death. No significant difference was found between the three study groups, with all three groups having a very small decline in QALYs (a drop of 0.03 to 0.04 points, on average) over 18 months.In addition, no significant difference was found between the groups in terms of participants’ cumulative number of depression-free days, which ranged from 339 to 351 for the 18-month period. There was also no significant difference in terms of depressive symptoms at nine months, reported side effects of antidepressants, or rates of death or bleeding.Within the group of patients who received the most extensive intervention—notification of a positive screen plus an invitation to participate in depression care, which was offered at no cost—about a quarter of patients declined depression treatment from study providers. Those who accepted the invitation received medications, phone-based psychotherapy sessions or a combination of both, depending on the patient’s preferences—a therapy approach found to be effective in other trials. Although the trial did not show a significant benefit in this approach to screening these patients over other groups in the trial, Kronish said that further study is warranted to identify effective ways to address depression and its associated risks in those suffering acute coronary syndromes.”We hope this isn’t the final word on this question and that others will look into different ways to identify heart attack survivors who could benefit from depression treatment,” Kronish said. “In addition, we need to think about how we can improve our depression treatments to have a bigger benefit, which could make screening more worthwhile.”Besides exploring different approaches to screening for and treating depression, Kronish added that it might be helpful to better educate patients about the impact of depressive symptoms on heart health, which could potentially improve patients’ engagement in their care and increase the effectiveness of depression treatment. Source:https://www.acc.org/last_img read more

Airbus overtakes Boeing says could halt A380 programme Update

Citation: Airbus overtakes Boeing, says could halt A380 programme (Update) (2018, January 15) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-airbus-flies-boeing-aircraft.html © 2018 AFP Airbus and Boeing eye lucrative maintenance market Explore further European aerospace giant Airbus overtook arch-rival Boeing in terms of aircraft orders last year, but warned that it could cease making its A380 jet if it does not receive any more orders for the supersize plane. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Airbus said that without new orders from Dubai-based airline, Emirates, it will be forced to halt its A380 programme Airbus said it booked a total 1,109 aircraft orders and a record 718 deliveries in 2017.By comparison, US rival Boeing booked 912 orders and 763 deliveries. Chief operating officer Fabrice Bregier said that overall deliveries could rise to 800 this year, given the increased pace of production of its A320neo aircraft.The medium-haul A320neo and A321neo jets feature new generation engines that use 15 percent less fuel compared to their peers.”We are going to double the number of A320neos” delivered this year, Bregier told a news conference. “If we do that, we will be close to 800 deliveries in 2018.”He acknowledged that deliveries of the A320neo had been slowed last year by problems with the engines made by US firm Pratt & Withney and by CFM, the joint venture of General Electric and Safran. Nevertheless, the problems were gradually being resolved and around 30 aircraft were waiting for their engines, down from 60 at the beginning of the year, he said.Turning to the A380, sales director, John Leahy, warned that Airbus would have no choice but to halt the programme if Dubai’s Emirates airline—the main customer for the superjumbo launched in 2007—did not place another order.”We are still talking to Emirates, but honestly, they are probably the only one to have the ability right now on the market place to take a minimum of six per year on a period of eight to 10 years,” Leahy said.”Quite honestly, if we can’t work out a deal with Emirates there is no choice but to shut down the programme,” Leahy said.”But I’m hopeful that we work out a deal with Emirates,” he added.There have been a total of 317 orders for the A380, the world’s largest passenger airliner, since its launch.Airbus had been hoping to secure another major order from Emirates, which took delivery of its 100th A380 in 2017, at the Dubai Air Show in November. But the airline finally picked 40 Boeing 787-10 jets instead.Lower trajectoryCOO Bregier said the “trajectory will be to go lower” in production of the A380.”We will deliver 12 aircraft as planned in 2018,” and the number could fall to six per year in subsequent years, Bregier said. “The challenge will be to maintain at least this level in the years to come” before customers start placing replacement orders for the A380s they currently have in service, and “potential new markets” start opening up, he said.Turning to Airbus’ overall performance last year, the planemaker insisted that commercial aircraft deliveries in 2017 “were up for the 15th year in a row, reaching a new company record.” At the end of 2017, Airbus’ overall backlog stood at 7,265 aircraft valued at $1.059 trillion (867 billion euros) at list prices, the company said.”A new Airbus delivery record coupled with our fourth best order intake wraps up a remarkable year for us,” Bregier insisted. read more