Private schools should have procedures in place to report crimes Police

first_imgTORONTO — A high-ranking Toronto police officer investigating allegations of assault and sexual assault at St. Michael’s College School says private schools should establish rules for reporting crimes to authorities similar to the ones all public schools have in place.Insp. Domenic Sinopoli, head of the sex crimes unit, says all public school boards in the city have signed protocols with the Toronto police that spell out the institutions’ responsibilities and the response to incidents where police involvement is required.He says private schools such as St. Michael’s, an all-boys’ institution that teaches grades 7 to 12, do not have such agreements with police.The Roman Catholic school has been at the centre of a police investigation into at least six incidents involving allegations of assault and sexual assault — some captured on video.Six students from the school were arrested on Monday and charged with assault, gang sexual assault and sexual assault with a weapon in connection with one of the incidents.St. Michael’s failure to promptly report the incidents to police has raised questions about how private schools handle such incidents and whether more government oversight is needed.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Candidate Nominations for 2019 Federal Election closed five candidates to run in

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Candidate Nominations for the 2019 Federal Election closed on September 30.According to Elections Canada, there are 2,146 candidates running in the election, across Canada’s 338 electoral districts.Officially running in the 2019 Federal Election for Prince George – Peace River – Northern Rockies include: Incumbent Bob Zimmer from the Conservative PartyRon Vaillant representing the Peoples Party of CanadaMavis Erickson of the Liberal PartyCatharine Kendall of the Green PartyMarcia Luccock representing the NDP PartyThe one candidate to have been removed from the list is Jacob Stokes of the Rhinoceros Party as he did not have his paperwork filed before the September 30 deadline.Ahead of the Federal Election, an All Candidates Forum is taking place in Fort St. John at The Lido on October 10.General Election day is set for October 21, 2019.last_img read more

Arcelor paying Rs 39500 cr for Essar Steel not Rs 42000 cr

first_imgNew Delhi: The world’s largest steel maker ArcelorMittal is in effect paying Rs 39,500 crore and not Rs 42,000 crore for buying Essar Steel as the remaining sum is being adjusted towards outstanding of an associate business, senior counsel Kapil Sibal Monday alleged in the NCLAT. Appearing on behalf of Standard Chartered, which is seeking to be treated at par with the secured financial creditor for its claim of Rs 3,500 crore, Sibal said bankers have clubbed Orissa Slurry Pipeline Ltd with Essar Steel in the auction to recover unpaid loans. Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: IcraOrissa Slurry Pipeline Ltd, he said, is a separate entity owned by SREI Infrastructure and Essar Steel, and was not part of the original offer to sell Essar Steel. Clubbing it with Essar Steel in the sale would benefit Lakshmi Mittal-run firm. Sibal argued that acceptance of Rs 39,500 crore as the bid amount by the Committee of Creditors (CoC) of Essar Steel, to which Standard Chartered Bank (SCB) was not part, is contrary to the undertaking given by ArcelorMittal to the Supreme Court. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 daysHe alleged that the truncated CoC of four members privately negotiated with ArcelorMittal to get a Slurry Pipeline, which is not even an asset of Essar Steel. An amount of Rs 2,500 crore, which should have been paid to Standard Chartered, has been diverted to lenders of Odisha Slurry Pipeline India Ltd, which owns the slurry pipeline. Such private negotiations should not have been undertaken by the four members of the CoC, which are to the detriment of the stakeholders of Essar Steel and concern assets of a different company altogether, he said. Standard Chartered had filed a plea in the National Company Law Appellate Tribunal (NCLAT) opposing a decision by a lower court to sell Essar Steel to ArcelorMittal as it stands to lose a substantial part of loans it had extended to Essar. Standard Chartered is to get just 1.7 per cent of its outstanding claims while the financial creditors were recovering close to 92 per cent of their claims from the sale proceeds. Sibal also questioned the authority of the CoC to distribute money received from the auction of Essar Steel saying it was only empowered to approve or reject a resolution plan. He protested that Standard Chartered was not allowed to be present and become part of voting at the CoC, which comprised lenders for slurry pipeline project also. SCB also argued that profits made by Essar Steel during the insolvency period were being misappropriated by ArcelorMittal. Such funds are otherwise required to be distributed amongst creditors. The NCLAT directed a day-to-day hearing of the case and posted the matter for hearing on Tuesday when Sibal will continue his arguments. ArcelorMittal sought time for its senior counsel Harish Salve to appear on its behalf on May 20 or May 24. The NCLAT had last week sought a response from ArcelorMittal on a petition filed by a majority shareholder of Essar Steel seeking rejection of the Rs 42,000 crore bid alleging that its promoter Lakshmi Mittal hid his association with loan defaulting firms run by his brothers.last_img read more

Investment in antiHIVAIDS services paying off but sustained effort needed – UN

Growing access to HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention services resulted in a 15 per cent decline in new infections over the past decade and a 22 per cent drop in AIDS-related deaths in the past five years, the United Nations reported today, urging sustained long-term effort to combat the disease.“It has taken the world 10 years to achieve this level of momentum,” said Gottfried Hirnschall, the Director of WHO’s HIV/AIDS Department, releasing a report produced in conjunction with UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) on the global response to the pandemic.“There is now a very real possibility of getting ahead of the epidemic. But this can only be achieved by both sustaining and accelerating this momentum over the next decade and beyond,” said Mr. Hirnschall.Advances in HIV science and programme innovations over the past year have raise hope for further progress in the future, according to the report, released ahead of the World AIDS Day, which is marked on 1 December every year.It is crucial that new science, technologies and approaches be applied to improve the efficacy of HIV programmes especially during the current global economic uncertainty and related austerity measures, according to the report.Some of the successes include improved access to HIV testing services, according to the report, highlighting, for example, that 61 per cent of pregnant women in Eastern and Southern Africa now receive testing and counselling for HIV, up from 14 per cent in 2005. An estimated 48 per cent of pregnant women in need of effective medicines to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV received them last year.Antiretroviral therapies (ART), which improve the health and well-being of those infected and stop further HIV transmission, are available now for 6.65 million people in low- and middle-income countries, which account for 47 per cent of the 14.2 million people eligible to receive them.The report acknowledges that investment in HIV services could lead to total gains of up to $34 billion by 2020 in increased economic activity and productivity, more than offsetting the costs of ART programmes, pointing out that healthier people are better able to engage in financially gainful activities.Despite the progress, more than half of all infected people in need of antiretroviral therapies in low- and middle-income countries are still unable to access them. Many do not even know that they are infected.Some countries are still not tailoring their programmes meet the needs of those most at risk or in need. In many cases, vulnerable groups – including adolescent girls, people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men, transgender people, sex workers, prisoners and migrants – remain unable to access HIV prevention and treatment services, the report notes.Paul De Lay, Deputy Executive Director of UNAIDS, cautioned that funding shortfalls could undermine efforts to roll back the disease.“To reach these targets, we estimate we need between $22 and 24 billion per year by the year 2015,” he told UN Radio.“Today we are falling short by seven billion. Now, more than ever, ending AIDS requires a unified approach of governments, multilateral agencies, NGOs [non-governmental organizations], foundations, the private sector and individuals.”Children have not benefited as much as adults from treatment, care and support, according to Leila Pakkala, Director of the UNICEF office in Geneva.“The coverage of HIV interventions for children remains alarmingly low. Through concerted action and equity-focused strategies, we must make sure that global efforts are working for children as well as adults,” said Ms. Pakkala. 30 November 2011Growing access to HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention services resulted in a 15 per cent decline in new infections over the past decade and a 22 per cent drop in AIDS-related deaths in the past five years, the United Nations reported today, urging sustained long-term effort to combat the disease. read more

Cargill gets 10M tax breaks to stay in Kansas

WICHITA, Kan. – Documents obtained by The Associated Press show that a deal to keep agribusiness giant Cargill operations in Wichita includes nearly $10 million in tax breaks over a 10-year period from state and local government entities.The documents, which came from an open records request, show the incentive package includes tax abatements and sales tax exemptions from state, county, city and school district, but no outright cash incentives.The city agreed to provide industrial revenue bonds to build a facility estimated to cost up to $41.6 million, plus an estimated $6 million more for equipment and machinery.In return, Cargill commits to staying in Wichita for at least 15 years.The Minnesota-based company has its beef business, turkey and cooked meat business and processed-protein services in Wichita. Cargill gets $10M tax breaks to stay in Kansas by Roxana Hegeman, The Associated Press Posted Jun 6, 2016 3:39 pm MDT Last Updated Jun 6, 2016 at 4:26 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

CV manufacturing output down but light at the end of the tunnel

Overall UK commercial vehicle production fell by 2,179 units year-on-year despite production of certain new models beginning to ramp up.Output for year-to-date down by a quarter (25.2%) due to plant restructuring over the past year.Exports increased for the first time in six months as the European commercial vehicle market gradually recovers.“UK commercial vehicle production remained negative in September, while key manufacturing facilities adjusted to new models,” said Mike Hawes, SMMT Chief Executive. “We expect monthly output to level off in the coming months, with the restructuring of operations last year now only affecting the year-to-date figures.” CV manufacturing output rolling year total    CV manufacturing output, year-to-date, 2012-2014  Click through to download the UK CV manufacturing news release for September 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more

Bucks sprint past Sparty inch closer to top of Big Ten race

In Ohio State’s loss to Purdue last Wednesday, junior Jon Diebler missed what would have been a game-tying 3-pointer as time expired. Sunday, with just a three-point lead at Michigan State and less than two minutes remaining, the Buckeyes again called on Diebler.This time, he didn’t disappoint. Diebler hit what proved to be a game-clinching 3-point shot in the Buckeyes 74-67 win over the Spartans on Sunday.“I think when you get to this stage and you got two great basketball teams playing, a lot of it comes down to someone making a big play,” OSU coach Thad Matta said. “Jon did a great job of spotting up and that was a big shot for us.”Unlike Wednesday night, it was OSU that came out of the gates fast. A 15-0 first-half run gave the Buckeyes an early 23-12 lead, but even with a 13-point lead at halftime, the second half brought exactly what Matta expected. “As I told our guys at halftime, you’re playing one of the best teams in the country, and they are going to make a run at you,” Matta said. “Sure enough they did.”Michigan State came roaring back and took the lead with four minutes to go — the Spartans’ first lead since 12-10 early in the first half. It was short-lived, however, as sophomore William Buford made both ends of a one-and-one with 3:45 remaining, and with the help of Diebler’s 3-pointer, the Buckeyes took back the lead for good. Buford finished the game with 17 points and 10 rebounds, but it was junior Evan Turner that again led the way for the Buckeyes. Turner, who came into the game battling flu-like symptoms, shook off any sickness and scored a game-high 20 points to go with his 10 rebounds and six assists. His performance Sunday was yet another example of why he is considered a serious contender for National Player of the Year. Though Matta said he doesn’t spend much time worrying about his potential award-winner, he knows how much Turner means to his basketball team.  “I know this: Evan Turner is a great basketball player, he’s a great kid, he’s a great competitor and he’s a great ambassador for the Ohio State University,” Matta said. “Where he stacks up against everyone else I don’t know, but he’s really damn important to me.”The Buckeyes and Spartans, both 21-7 overall, now sit in a tie for second place in the BigTen standings with an 11-4 conference record, one half-game behind Purdue (23-3, 11-3).OSU travels to State College, Pa., to face Penn State Wednesday. read more

UK judge demands Apple redo Samsung apology

first_imgApple may be winning many of its patent lawsuits around the world, but in the UK it’s a different story. Last week Apple was forced to put a notice/apology on its website stating that Samsung didn’t actually infringe Apple device designs because they are “not as cool.”The notice that appeared was anything but apologetic. In fact, the six paragraphs just summarized the judgement and then went on to point out other courts had found Samsung was engaging in unfair competition and copied the iPad design. In other words, Apple doesn’t agree with the UK courts and wanted to make that very clear.Not unexpectedly, Apple is in trouble for posting the notice. UK judges found it to be in breach of the original order and have demanded it be removed and replaced alongside an acknolwedgement that the original notice was inaccurate. Apple’s lawyer Michael Beloff has argued that the notice fulfilled the order and dispelled “commercial uncertainty.” However, Apple seems to have already complied by taking the original notice down so we should expect a replacement soon.To add to the drama, Apple has requested 14 days to get the revised notice ready and posted on Apple.com. Judge Robin Jacob has rejected that request and asked Apple submit an affidavit explaining why it would take so long as it’s unbelievable. It’s just a notice on a web page after all, and something they have already done a few days ago.If Apple had simply followed the original order and not turned it into a statement of how much they disagree with the ruling then we’d all have forgotten about it by now. As it stands, this is set to run on and on, and Apple is constantly reminding everyone Samsung didn’t infringe its design patents in the UK.Read more at Bloomberglast_img read more

Archos 97 Titanium HD une tablette tactile haute résolution dans la gamme

first_imgArchos 97 Titanium HD : une tablette tactile haute résolution dans la gamme ElementsLe fabricant Archos a annoncé la prochaine sortie d’une nouvelle tablette tactile Android. Baptisée 97 Titanium HD, elle est équipée d’un écran 9,7 pouces et d’une résolution Retina de 2048 x 1536 pixels.Alors que les tablettes tactiles font partie des cadeaux stars achetés pour Noël, l’année 2013 ne sera vraisemblablement pas en reste du côté des nouveaux modèles et les annonces ont même déjà commencé ! Sur son site, le fabricant Archos a ainsi dévoilé sa dernière création : une nouvelle tablette baptisée 97 Titanium HD qui entre dans sa gamme Elements.À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?Basée sous Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean), elle est équipée d’un écran IPS de 9,7 pouces avec une résolution de 2048 x 1536 pixels. Ajouté à cela, elle est dotée d’un processeur Dual Core de type A9 cadencé à 1.6 GHz, d’un GPU Quad core Mali400, et de 1 Go de RAM. Côté photo, la 97 Titanium dispose d’un capteur de 2 mégapixels à l’avant et de 5 mégapixels au dos. De quoi prendre de jolis clichés à stocker sur 8 Go de mémoire flash extensible grâce à un port MicroSD. Côté connectivité, la tablette possède le Wi-Fi mais pas le Bluetooth. Si ces caractéristiques ont de quoi allécher, Archos n’a pas donné d’informations quant au prix de sa tablette HD. C’est pourtant ce qui pourrait lui permettre de concurrencer les autres modèles HD déjà présents sur le marché et dont les prix avoisinent les 400 euros. De même, le fabricant n’a pas dévoilé la date de sortie 97 Titanium HD. Le 24 décembre 2012 à 15:28 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

2/16 Total Divas sees a slight drop in overall TV viewers

first_img The 2/16 Total Divas on E! drew 808,000 viewers on Tuesday night. This is slightly down from last week’s show that drew 810,000 viewers.The show has continued to see viewers tune out since the season premiere back on 1/19.Source: Showbuzzdaily.comRecommended videosPowered by AnyClipRachel Bloom announces pregnancy following Emmy winVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseUnmuteDuration 0:42/Current Time 0:05Loaded: 100.00%0:05Remaining Time -0:37 FullscreenUp NextThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Replay the list Kim Kardashian ‘Got in Trouble’ With Kanye For Daughter North Wearing Makeup Rachel Bloom announces pregnancy following Emmy win Now Playing Up Next Jason Namako RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Disney+ Axes ‘Muppets’ series SPOILERS: 2/16 and 2/17 Impact TV tapings in Las Vegas to air on Pursuit/Twitch WhatsApp Monday Night Raw nominated for TV Show of the Year at the People’s Choice Awards Now Playing Up Next Videos Articlescenter_img Now Playing Up Next Now Playing Up Next Pinterest Felicity Huffman To Be Sentenced In College Admission Scandal Now Playing Up Next Google+ Ronda Rousey, Sonya Deville join Total Divas Season 9 cast, will premiere on October 2 Millie Bobby Brown lands new Netflix movie deal with sister Twitter rachel bloomlast_img read more

Ballots for Clark County school levies mailed out Wednesday

first_imgBallots for the Feb. 12 special election were mailed to all eligible registered voters Jan. 23. Voters in the Battle Ground, Camas, La Center, Ridgefield and Vancouver school districts will receive a ballot.Voters who do not receive their ballot by Feb. 1 should contact the Clark County Elections Office, 360-397-2345, via e-mail at elections@clark.wa.gov or in person at 1408 Franklin St. from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.The public is invited to observe a logic and accuracy test of programming to tabulate ballots at 10 a.m. Jan. 29 at the elections office. The test is required by state law.Election results will be available after 8 p.m. on Election Day at clarkvotes.org. A sample ballot also is available.last_img read more

Three die in deadly car crash in Atka

first_imgThree people have died and six more are injured after a passenger van rolled-over in Atka Tuesday night. Alaska State Troopers say they learned of the single vehicle crash just after 6 p.m.Download AudioAtka Pride Seafoods in 2013.(Photo by Lauren Rosenthal, KUCB – Unalaska)The people involved in the accident are employees of Atka Pride Seafoods which is a subsidiary of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association (APICDA). In a press release, APICDA’s Ellen Krsnak said the accident occurred when they were traveling from the processing plant to the bunkhouse for dinner. The Coast Guard has transported several of the injured parties to Anchorage.Megan Peters is the public information officer for the Alaska State Troopers. She said Troopers will be in the village today to investigate.“When we do have our guys flying out to remote locations a lot of times cell phone service is bad or they don’t have a radio signal there, so while our troopers are there and learning stuff and they’re able to confirm things on scene it makes it difficult to relay information to a lot of people quickly,” Peters said.She said if phone service is bad, she does not want to tie up the lines when the troopers are trying to deal with the actual incident.Names of the injured and deceased are being held until families can be notified.last_img read more

Ayushmann Khurrana to play gay character in Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan who

first_imgAyushmann KhurranaTwitterAyushmann Khurrana, who had two back-to-back hits last year with Andhadhun and Badhaai Ho, has his hands full with projects. The latest news is that the talented actor will star in the second instalment of his 2017 sleeper hit Shubh Mangal Saaavdhan that had Bhumi Pednekar in the female lead.The second instalment in the series is titled Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan and will star another actor, who is yet to be cast. While the first movie from the franchise dealt with the theme of erectile dysfunction, interestingly, the second film will deal with another social taboo that is homosexuality. “The first draft of the script has been locked. This time the makers have decided to bring homosexuality as the main theme in a mainstream Hindi film,” a source told Mumbai Mirror.The source further said that the story revolves around how a conservative small town family comes to terms with the fact that their son is gay. Producer Aanand L Rai confirming the news said: “The Shubh Mangal Saavdhan franchise is our tribute to the churning that keeps our society alive. Every instalment will deal with a topic that touches every person but no one wants to speak about it publicly. Like the first film, this one too will broach a taboo subject with great sensitivity and light humour. I anticipate a lot of conversations and cheer around the second film too.”The movie is expected to go on the floors in the last week of August and the makers are targeting an early 2020 release.Before shooting for Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan, Ayushmann will wrap up Bala that features him as a small town guy who is battling premature balding. Bala also features Bhumi Pednekar, Yami Gautam in key roles. Ayushmann Khurrana and Bhumi Pednekar in Shubh Mangal Saavdhanlast_img read more

Mumbai Ola and Uber drivers likely to go on strike for fare

first_imgReuters FileOla and Uber cab drivers are holding a strike on Monday, October 22 in Mumbai, demanding a hike in minimum fare and charges per km amid the rising fuel prices.The drivers have also demanded that the bookings for the rides be made only through Aadhaar-verified numbers of the customers, reports IANS.Few cabs are likely to remain off-roads in Mumbai today following the drivers’ strike.For the first time, the cab drivers are demanding a fixed minimum fare between Rs 100 and Rs 150 and the charge per km between Rs 18 and Rs 23, depending upon the type of vehicle booked, according to Times of India.”We need an assured business of at least Rs 3,000 a day,” one of the cab drivers told TOI.They claimed that they had to take this step amid the increase in fuel prices even as Ola and Uber kept reducing fares. This also impacted their daily earnings. The drivers are planning to submit a memorandum to the aggregator firm officials and put up a demand for the same.However, petrol and diesel prices have dropped by around 30 paise today. A litre of petrol in Mumbai is currently sold at Rs 86.91 per litre (reduce by Rs 0.30) and diesel is at Rs 78.54 per litre (reduce by 0.28). Petrol and diesel prices in Delhi are Rs 81.44 per litre (reduce by Rs 0.30) and Rs 74.92 per litre (reduce by Rs 0.27), respectively.last_img read more

Water transportation resumes

first_imgTransportation on the waterways is likely to resume from Sunday morning after a two-day suspension.Transportation on the country’s waterways resumed on Sunday after a three-day disruption caused by very severe cyclonic storm Fani, reports UNB.Shafiqul Alam, director of Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority (BIWTA), said the services resumed around 7:00am after the Chandpur-bound launch ‘MV Bogdadia’ left from Sadarghat.On 2 May, BIWTA suspended operations of all types of water vessels across the country due to inclement weather.The Chattogram port resumed operations on Saturday afternoon after a 30-hour disruption caused by Fani.last_img read more

Arlington Arts Center Networking In The City

first_imgCandice Nicole Public Relations is sponsoring a “Networking In The City” event on Feb. 27 from 6:30 p.m. – 9:30 p. m. at the Arlington Arts Center, 3550 Wilson Boulevard. Networking in the City is for local entrepreneurs, freelancers and like-minded members in D.C. metropolitan area. Tickets cost $5, which includes a gift bag. For more information, visit charmthemevents.com or networkinginthecity.eventbrite.com.last_img

Trends in Cardiac Ultrasound at ACC16

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiation Oncology View all 91 items RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  MD Buyline market analyst Jon Brubaker explains the new cardiac ultrasound technologies and trends he saw on the show floor at the 2016 meeting of the American College of Cardiology (ACC).  Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Recent Videos View all 606 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Conference Coverage View all 396 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM.center_img Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Videos | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | April 29, 2016 Trends in Cardiac Ultrasound at ACC.16 CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Women’s Health View all 62 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Information Technology View all 220 items Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more news and videos from AAPM.last_img read more

NTSB Amtrak engineer wasnt talking texting on cellphone

first_img Here’s how to repair and patch damaged drywall In its updated report Wednesday, the National Transportation Safety Board said an examination of the cellphone of the engineer, Brandon Bostian, also indicated he didn’t access the train’s Wi-Fi system while he was operating the locomotive.Bostian suffered a head injury in the May 12 crash, and his attorney has said he doesn’t remember anything after the train pulled out of Philadelphia’s 30th Street Station, the last stop before the derailment.Bostian provided investigators with his passcode to the phone, allowing them access to the data, the NTSB said.While investigators have ruled out the most obvious uses of the phone before the crash, they have not eliminated some others such as the use of an app, NTSB board member Bella Dinh-Zarr said at a Senate Commerce Committee hearing on train safety Wednesday. The agency says that to determine whether the phone was powered off, investigators in its laboratory have been examining its operating system, which contains more than 400,000 files of metadata.Investigators are also obtaining a phone identical to the engineer’s and will be running additional tests to validate the data. Bostian’s phone was used to make calls and send text messages the day of the accident, but inconsistencies in phone records presented difficulties, NTSB Chairman Chris Hart told Congress last week. The voice and text messages were recorded in different time zones and may not have been calibrated to the times of other equipment on the train, such as a camera focused on the tracks and a recorder that registers how fast the train was moving and actions by the engineer, he said. Clean energy: Why it matters for Arizona New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies Arizona families, Arizona farms: providing the local community with responsibly produced dairy Accident investigators have said previously that they have not found any mechanical problems with the train. The track had been inspected not long before the crash.On Tuesday, the House passed a transportation spending bill that includes $9 million for Amtrak to install inward-facing cameras in locomotive cabs. Five years ago, the NTSB recommended that the Federal Railroad Administration require railroads install the cameras so investigators would have a video and sound recording of what was going inside the cab in the event of an accident.Regulators convened an industry-labor advisory committee to work on possible regulations last year. But the committee has been unable to reach a consensus, and the railroad administration has said it will pursue regulations without the committee’s endorsement. However, it could be years before regulations are proposed and then made final.Rather than waiting for regulations, Amtrak will install the cameras on trains in the Northeast Corridor on its own, the railroad’s president and CEO, Joseph Boardman, said recently.The NTSB recommendation on cameras was made as the board wrapped up an investigation into the Sept. 12, 2008 head-on collision between a Metrolink commuter train and a Union Pacific freight train in Chatsworth, California. The Metrolink train ran through a red signal. Twenty-five people were killed and scores injured. The NTSB faulted the Metrolink train’s engineer for the collision, saying that he was distracted by text messages he was sending while on duty. However, that was a deduction because investigators didn’t have a complete record of the engineer’s actions that a camera would have provided. Sponsored Stories WASHINGTON (AP) — The engineer in last month’s fatal Amtrak crash wasn’t using his cellphone to talk, text or download anything just before the train sped off the tracks, investigators said Wednesday, addressing one big question about what might have caused the accident but only deepening the mystery of what did.Eight people were killed and about 200 were injured in the crash in Philadelphia. For reasons still unknown, the train accelerated to 106 miles per hour in the minute before it entered a curve where the speed limit is 50, investigators have said previously. In the last few seconds the brakes were applied with maximum force, but the train was still traveling at over 100 mph when it left the tracks.center_img Get a lawn your neighbor will be jealous of Milstead says best way to stop wrong-way incidents is driving sober 0 Comments   Share   Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility Top Stories At Wednesday’s hearing, Dinh-Zarr also urged the swift installation by railroads of positive train control, a technology that can prevent trains from derailing because of excessive speed, as well as collisions between trains. NTSB first recommended trains have the technology in 1970, and has since investigated 140 accidents that it could have prevented, she said.Congress mandated in 2008 that Amtrak, commuter railroads and freight railroads install positive train control by the end of this year. Amtrak still has to do extensive testing of the system but will meet the deadline in the busy Northeast Corridor between Boston and Washington, officials have said.Most railroads, however, will not make the deadline. Robert Lauby, the railroad administration’s associate administrator for safety, said 29 percent of commuter railroads will make the deadline and about half of the rest estimate they will be ready by 2018. But the nation’s largest freight railroads don’t expect to be ready until the end of 2020, he said.___Follow Joan Lowy on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ApCopyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

BMO and Harris Private Bank Release 2011 Study

first_img Agents & Brokers Attorneys & Title Companies Company News Investors Lenders & Servicers Processing Service Providers 2012-01-25 Abby Gregory The uptick in existing home sales to end 2011 is, obviously, a positive industry trend, and a new study released by “”BMO Economics””:www.bmonesbittburns.com/economics/ and “”Harris Private Bank””:www.theharris.com/ indicates that the sales pace is likely to continue upward, based on data that shows increasing numbers of potential buyers are moving into the marketplace.[IMAGE]Introducing the findings within the collaborative study, Doug Porter, deputy chief economist for BMO Economics, said, “”December’s gain was the third rise in a row and is the highest number of sales since January of last year. It is now up 40 percent from the lows hit in July 2010.””According to estimates from the report, sales during 2011 climbed a total of 2.5 percent, landing at 4.29 million units to end the year. The rise in sales is believed to “”erase”” the 3.4 percent drop shown during 2010.Single-family home sales reached an 18-month high in December, and additionally, statistics showed that the tally of condos sold hit an eight-month high. The accumulation of existing homes felt some year-end relief as well, with the inventory of single-family units declining by 10 percent in December.The share of first time buyers, however, is flagging, and only 31 percent of those purchasing homes in December of 2011 were making their initial entry into the housing market. Numbers of repeat purchasers rose to 48 percent of the total market share.Porter continued his commentary on the survey, noting, “”The combined effects of record low mortgage rates, near record high affordability, a more promising economic recovery, job creation, and low prices are beckoning homebuyers out of the woodwork.””Harris Private Bank’s chief investment officer, Jack Ablin, also weighed in on the results of the study, saying, “”While some buyers may believe that better deals will be available for those that wait, stable prices and increased activity will go a long way to instill some urgency into buyers’ psyche.””The financial institution’s senior vice president of retail lending extended his thoughts on the findings, stating, “”We are seeing some very encouraging signs in the housing sector and rising consumer confidence all of which is helping to drive this positive trend. With interest rates at historic lows and housing prices appearing to be stabilizing, more consumers have been contacting our branches and mortgage loan officers to determine which of our various mortgage loan products best meet their financial and home ownership goals””. BMO and Harris Private Bank Release 2011 Study January 25, 2012 449 Views center_img in Data, Government, Origination, Secondary Market, Servicing, Technology Sharelast_img read more